Tuesday, January 25, 2011

COLORFUL, ROMANTIC ITALIAN VIEWS



Franz Richard Unterberger was born in Innsbruck, in what was then the Austro-Hungarian Empire, on 15th August 1838, one of eleven children of a wealthy bourgeois family. He decided to pursue a career as an artist at a relatively young age and enrolled in the Academy in Munich. Here he studied with Albert Zimmerman (1808-1888) a professor and landscape painter at the Academy and with Julius Lange (1817-1878). It was as a painter of Alpine landscapes that Unterberger first drew recognition, views particularly set in his native Tyrol. In 1860 Unterberger continued his studies in Düsseldorf; in what was to be a particularly significant period. He was much taken by the work of Oswald Aschenbach (1827-1905) a landscape painter and his brother Andreas (1815-1910) also a landscape painter who worked extensively in Scandinavia before moving to Italy in the 1870’s.
(macconnal-mason.com)


The view from the Balcony
Oil on canvas
Private collection
From ARC at artrenewal.org


Amalfi
Oil on canvas
Private collection
From ARC at artrenewal.org


Amalfi, Golfe de Salerne
Oil on canvas
Private collection
From ARC at artrenewal.org


Amalfi, The Gulf Of Salerno
Oil on canvas
Private collection
From ARC at artrenewal.org


The Amalfi Coast
Oil on canvas
Private collection
From ARC at artrenewal.org


Rio St. Barnaba, Venice
Oil on canvas
Private collection
From ARC at artrenewal.org


Rio Santa Barnaba, Venice
Oil on canvas
Private collection
From ARC at artrenewal.org


Canale Della Giudecca
From onework.ru


Düsseldorf was the favoured academy for Scandinavian painters studying abroad and as a result of this northern influence Unterberger was drawn to Scandinavia where in the early 1860’s he produced a number of atmospheric mountainous scenes. Following this period Unterberger moved to Brussels, largely since he believed the art market there was likely to be more lucrative, he was to live and work there periodically for most of his life, though never acquiring a property or citizenship. Unterberger was becoming a truly European artist, in the 1860’s painting from Norway to Sicily. By the 1870’s he was exhibiting throughout Europe, Hamburg, Antwerp, Brussels, Berlin, Stuttgart, Paris, Munich, Vienna and in addition Philadelphia and Boston. He was now painting panoramic Italian scenes, coastal landscapes set in Southern Italy, Capri, Naples, Amalfi, Sorrento, Palermo and views set in Venice. His works suffused with a warm Mediterranean light and a shimmering silvery tone.
(macconnal-mason.com)


The Bay of Naples
Oil on canvas
Private collection
From ARC at artrenewal.org


The Bay of Naples
Oil on canvas
Private collection
From ARC at artrenewal.org


Unterberger settled in Brussels in 1864, where he spent the rest of his life. During this period, he usually spent summers at Neuilly-sur-Seine (outside of Paris), and from there he often visited Sicily and southern Italy, notedly Naples (above) and its environs where he painted some of his best pictures. Unterberger also traveled along the coast of England and Scotland. These trips provided inspiration for many of the artist’s finest paintings. He also found great success in Vienna, where he exhibited and received several medals, including the Order of Francis Joseph.
(andersongalleries.com)


A View of Posilippo, Naples
Oil on canvas
Private collection
From ARC at artrenewal.org


Posillipo (above) is a residential quarter of Naples, called Pusilleco in the Neapolitan language. The ancient Greeks first named this rocky, wooded region at the western end of the Bay of Naples Pausylipon, meaning “respite from worry.” The area remained largely undeveloped until a road, via Posillipo, was completed in 1824.
Unterberger portrays the quaint architectural setting of this Neapolitan town, as well as the landscape beyond it. He depicts the shoreline of the Bay of Naples with Mount Vesuvius looming in the distance. This infamous volcano responsible for the destruction of Pompeii in 79 AD was still active during the 19th century; therefore the artist represents Vesuvius billowing smoke. In the foreground, a group of peasants are at rest, dressed in the traditional costume of the period. A large fishing net is draped over railing, indicating the livelihood of some of the inhabitants of Posillopo. In the background, more peasants gather near the entryway of a humble residence.
(andersongalleries.com)
Unterberger was a romantic style painter of landscapes, genre, architectures, and water scenes. He is best known for his scenic paintings Italy, which feature intimate views as well as large vistas of the country’s iconic cities. Unterberger’s romantic atmospheric style of painting remains very popular and his works can be found in important private and museum collections throughout America and Europe.
(andersongalleries.com)
In 1883 Unterberger exhibited in Venezuela and the following year in London at the International Universal Exhibition, in the Austrian section. He was an artist with a huge International following. Southern Italian and Venetian scenes formed the majority of his output in the 1890’s. In his later years Unterberger moved to a studio in Neuilly-sur-Seine where he died 25th May 1902.
His works can be found in museums in: Amalfi; Louviers; Melbourne; Troyes and Venice.
(macconnal-mason.com)

Franz Richard Unterberger Bio:
• 1838 Born to the son of an art dealer in Innsbruck, Austria on August 15th
• 1853 First studied at the Munich Academy with Clemens von Zimmermann and Julius Lange and continued training at the Weimar Academy under Albert Zimmermann
• 1859 After a visit to Milan, returned to Munich due to the unsettled political situation
• 1859 Enrolled at Dusseldorf Academy where he joined the Achenbach brothers, who became famous for their landscapes
• 1864 Visited and painted in Norway and Belgium before settling in Brussels; continued to travel in Italy, England, and Scotland and even exhibited in Vienna where he received several medals including the Order of Francis Joseph
• 1902 Died
(inartshow.com)


Monday, January 24, 2011

'CHAMPS'




Map of Jamaica
From zonu.com


Arthur Wint and Herb Mckenely, 1948 Olympics
From en.wikipedia.org


Jamaica has the prestigious honor of having the most success per capita of any country world in track and field. This great honor started when Jamaica's first track Gold Medallists Dr Authur Wint won the 400m in 1948 Olympics. He along other greats Herb McKenley, Leslie Laing, and George Rhoden put Jamaica on the map in one of the greatest relays when the team won the 4 x 400 relay in the 1952 Olympics.
(Track & Field, Published Mar 21, 2004 at jamaicans.com)


Merlene Ottey, 1983
Running for Nebraska University
Photo from fanclub member Dave at jakobweb.dk


The darling of Jamaica
Marlene Ottey
From meppublishers.com


Jamaica's success at the Olympics and international competitions continued throughout years with athletes like Donald Quarrie (gold 200m, silver 100m, in the 1976 Olympics), Bert Cameron (silver, 400 relay, 1988), to Grace Jackson (silver, 200m, 1988), to Winthrop Graham (silver, 400m hurdles, 1992), Raymond Stewart, Juliet Cuthbert (silver, 100, 200m, 1992), Deon Hemmings (gold, 400 hurdles, 1996) and perhaps the most popular athlete track Queen Merlene Ottey who has more International and Olympics medal than any other Jamaicans.
(Track & Field, Published Mar 21, 2004 at jamaicans.com)
According to the Jamaica's sports minister Olivia Grange, Jamaica gets a jump on its rivals right from the start.
"I always talk about the triple T - tradition, talent and training," she says.
"We have an extremely good school system. In our primary schools, physical education is mandatory, and we actually start competing from early childhood. We have our prep school championships, primary school championships, our secondary school championships."
Even before that, the gene pool in Jamaica is predisposed to producing powerful, explosive athletes.
(Tom Fordyce, BBC Sport journalist at bbc.co.uk)


Sheri Ann Brooks
From www.trackalerts.com


Team Jamaica
From trackalerts.com


In Jamaica there is only one event that grips the nation like the Olympic Games or World Championships – the national Boys and Girls Athletics Championships. To the rest of the world "Champs" may sound like a glorified school sports day, but to Jamaicans it is the highlight of the year, with crowds of 30,000 people gathering from across the island to watch over 100 schools battle it out for title of "King" or "Queen".
It is an event with 100 years of history – older even than our own national schools championships by 15 years – but it is only since the advent of Usain Bolt and his achievements in Beijing that the rest of the world has begun to sit up and take notice.
Everyone from hotel porters to fruit sellers in and around Kingston discuss which teenage stars to look out for. Bars and restaurants set up TV screens to watch the proceedings as the event is broadcast live from the National Stadium, with network channel CVMTV estimating around 1.2m viewers – from a population of 2.8m. Detailed reports dominate the front pages of the island's newspapers, with huge color photographs hailing the nation's freshest crop of track and field stars.
(Champs of the world, by Anna Kessel, The Observer, Sunday 5 April 2009 at guardian.co.uk)


Shelly Ann Fraser
From inside.nike.com


Usain Bolt
100m victory at Beijing Olympics 2008
(Triple Olympic Champion and World Record Holder)
Author Richard Giles
From en.wikipedia.org


It is surreal, listening to people on the street debate the merits of 15-year-old sprinters. Everyone has an opinion on who will be the next Bolt or Shelly Ann Fraser. In the national stadium, supporters of each high school demonstrate their loyalties, screaming for their favorites. Dressed in team colors – the supporters in the purple and white of Kingston College taking up a whole stand to them – they bang drums and enjoy soup and roast corn, or jerk chicken wrapped in tin foil. As darkness falls, groups of school kids making their way home take up sticks; there are often violent clashes on the streets outside the stadium. This is no token support, loyalty to high schools goes back generations through a family.
(Champs of the world, by Anna Kessel, The Observer, Sunday 5 April 2009 at guardian.co.uk)


Jamaican Track & field stars from Trelawny
By dejagib at flickr.com


Jamaican Track & field stars from Trelawny (above) features from left :
Omar Brown (Commonwealth 200m Champion)
Veronica Campbell (World Champion 100m. Olympic Champion 200m)
Michael Frater (World Championship silver medal 4x100m)
Usain Bolt (World 100m Record holder, World Junior Record holder 200m; World Championship Silver 200m; World championship silver 4x100m relay)
Marvin Anderson (World Championship 4x100m silver; World Championship 5th place 200m.

Every Jamaican athlete worth their salt began at 'Champs' – from Don Quarrie to Bolt himself – and each year the alumni return to watch the next generation. All of them credit the competition as the defining experience in their journey to success. There was even a story going around the island that Asafa Powell lacked mental toughness in competition because he did not compete enough at 'Champs' as a kid.
Established in 1910, 'Champs' are the bedrock of Jamaica's commitment to athletics success. The country eats, sleeps and breathes the sport, with even primary school children competing at the national stadium in the 'Preps'. Over 3,500 kids now compete annually at 'Champs', but the country's athletics infrastructure goes beyond annual events. Former Prime Minister Michael Manley – close friends with Fidel Castro – established a legacy when, receiving a grant from Cuba, he set up the GC Foster College in 1978, a higher education institution whose sole aim was to produce sports coaches for Jamaica.
That investment has reaped rewards. "We now have an athletics coach in every school, college and kindergarten in the country," explains Neville McCook, Council member of the IAAF and Secretary General of the Jamaica Olympic Association.
"It costs $22m Jamaican (£174,000) to put on 'Champs' each year," says McCook, "which is paid for by our main sponsor, but we also have other sponsors and we get royalties from the broadcasts. That money also assists the colleges in preparing for 'Champs' – which they do from June until March – the old boys association also pay a lot." Like every other alumni on the island and abroad, McCook is expected to dig into his own pocket to help fund future stars. McCook typically sponsors five athletes a year to help pay for, among other costs, medical bills and dental care. "One chapter in New York donated about $20,000 (£13,500), and three years ago our chapter in Miami put up a large sum to put up a new schools canteen."
Jamaicans say it is no surprise that their small island won an unprecedented 11 Olympic medals on the track IN 2008. While some prominent voices in the media questioned such prolific success, Jamaicans pointed to their investment – and results – at all age groups in recent years. While the rest of the world are fixated on the achievements of Bolt and his three gold medals and three world records in Beijing, Jamaica is already looking ahead to a "second tier" of sprinters. Their excitement is justified.
(Champs of the world, by Anna Kessel, The Observer, Sunday 5 April 2009 at guardian.co.uk)
Many Jamaican-born athletes have chosen to compete for other nations. Linford Christie was born in Saint Andrew, Jamaica. He immigrated to Britain at the age of seven and competed for them. He won three European Championship golds, three Commonwealth golds, one World gold and an Olympic Gold medal in the 100m. Tessa Sanderson was born in Saint Catherine, Jamaica. She immigrated to Britain and she won two Commonwealth golds and an Olympic Gold for her adopted nation. Former world record holder Donovan Bailey was born in Manchester, Jamaica but immigrated to Canada at the age of 13. He went on to win 3 World Championship golds and 2 Olympic Golds for Canada. Sanya Richards was born in Kingston, Jamaica. she moved to America at twelve years old. Despite being the daughter of a Jamaican football player Sanya chose to compete for the United States. In 2005 she won a silver medal at the World Championships and in 2008 won Olympic bronze. However in 2009 she finally fulfilled her potential by becoming world champion in the 400m. Canadian Ben Johnson was born in Falmouth, Jamaica and immigrated to Canada at the age of 15. He won two Olympic bronzes. Angella Taylor was born in Jamaica but competed for Canada. She won two Commonwealth golds. It was later discovered that she was part of a doping regime with Ben Johnson. Sprinter Charmaine Crooks competed at four consecutive Olympics for Canada winning a silver medal in the 4x400m relay but was actually born in Mandeville, Jamaica. High jumper Germaine Mason originally competed for Jamaica as he was born in Kingston but switched to Great Britain as his father was born there. He won an Olympic silver medal in 2008.
(en.wikipedia.org)


Veronica Campbell Brown
Adidas Grand Prix
From reggaeharmony.com


Veronica Campbell Brown
Reuters: Danny Moloshok at abc.net.au


Veronica Campbell Brown
200m double
From skysports.com


Asafa Powell
AFP: Emiliano Grillotti at abc.net.au


Relay team Beijing Olympic
Left to right: Powell, Carter, Bolt and Frater
From olympics....glife.com


Bridget Foster-Hylton
Berlin Germany 2009
First Jamaican to win Gold in 110 Hurdles and oldest ever
Getty Images


Jamaica now gains top rankings in athletics consistently, especially when measured per capita. In relation to some events (eg.100 and 400m) and individual rankings, Jamaica also leads the pack! The seed is sown in the culture, they all love athletics -they love to run! That spirit is evident from even pre-school fundays,where even the little babies run races!
Jamaica dominates the Caribbean championships every year! Herb McKenley, Merlene Ottey, Donald Quarrie, and Arthur Wint are among some of the famous older names in Jamaica's athletics. But nowadays, you will hear of Sherone Simpson, Veronica Campbell, James Beckford, Asafa Powell and Usain Bolt, for example, are some of the dominant names in their disciplines- anywhere in the world.
(my-island-jamaica.com)
The Jamaican people walked more than 20 miles weekly up and down the steep terrain of the countryside. This was their only means of getting to school, church, running errands and enjoying the pursuits of leisure. These activities provided an invaluable but unconscious physical preparation for athletics. This unconscious preparation was carried to another level by the coordination and rhythm acquired from hours spent performing African-derived popular dances.
The Jamaican capacity for sprinting was also attributed to genetic factors. It was in their African forebears that generous portions of the fast-twitch muscle fibers found in the elite sprinter were genetically developed.
(Arnold Bertram, Contributor, Friday, February 19, 2010 at jamaica-gleaner.com)


Saturday, January 22, 2011

'VUES DE PARIS'



Georges Stein was a French painter who specialized in poetic Parisian scenes imbued with nostalgia for a belle-epoque France. The window Stein provides into this earlier period of Parisian life offers the viewer a visual history of France and a personal connection to this provocative time. In his works, Stein captures the theatre of this iconic city with its flower vendors, gentlemen, children with nannies, and grandes duchesses, amongst other characters. He successfully merges these fascinating Parisians with well-known buildings, arrondissements, and places, thereby guiding us through Paris in a series of intimate glimpses.
(angeloilpainting.com)


A Street Scene In Bern
From artmight.com


A Sunny Day In Paris
From artmight.com


Rue du Colisee
Oil on Canvas, 1926
Private collection
From ARC at artrenewal.com


Evening on a Parisian Boulevard
Gouache
Private collection
From ARC at artrenewal.com


Les quais pres de Notre Dame
Oil On Canvas
Private collection
From ARC at artrenewal.com


El Bois de Boulogne
From 2.bp.blogspot.com


Parlamentsplatz
From bern-1914.org


A Flower Market along the Seine
From artmight.com


Flower Market along the Seine features the well-known Quai de l'Horloge in Paris. Located at the far end of the Ile de la Cite, this quai is framed by the Palais de Justice (law courts) and Tour de l'Horloge (clock tower) to the left and river Seine to the right. There is also an exquisite flower market at this quai which has attracted locals and visitors for decades. Stein captures the vibrant colors and an array of blossoms in this work and also includes a fashionable young Parisian in the foreground, clutching a bouquet of freshly purchased flowers.
(angeloilpainting.com)


Busy Traffic On The Champs Elysees Paris
From artmight.com


Mercado de Flores
From 2.bp.blogspot.com


Arco de Triunfo de L'Etoile
From 2.bp.blogspot.com


Iglesia de Notre Dame
From 2.bp.blogspot.com


El Moulin Rouge de Noche
From 2.bp.blogspot.com


Notre Dame vista desde L'Île Saint-Louis
From 2.bp.blogspot.com


Vista da Casa de Ópera, Paris
From joserosarioart.blogspot.com


Georges Stein is considered a Paris Boulevard painter and water colorist from the French school. He was born circa. 1870. However, there is confusion as to whether he was born in London or Paris. Since most of his paintings depict the wonderfully colorful streets of Paris, one would place his birth in France, as do the French. Georges Stein’s paintings are filled with movement, color, the smells and the sounds found only on an atmospheric wet street in the heart of Paris. He uses his genius to render each works in pastel, watercolor, and gouache, which very few artists can master. He masterfully creates scene that enables the viewer to feel like they are participating in the everyday hustle and bustle of the streets.
(haynesfineart.com)

Photos from Paris Exposition Univeselle de 1900:
(All photos from bern-1914.org)


Pont Alexandre - Avenue Nicolas II


Champs-Elysées - Le Petit Palais


Champs-Elysées - Le Grand Palais


Le Pont Alexandre


Porte des Invalides - Rue de Grenelle


Ponte des Invalides & Rue des Nations


Le Vieux Paris


Les Rives de la Seine - Vue d'Ensemble prise du Trocadéro


Champ-de-Mars - Vue d'Ensemble prise du Château-d'Eau


Trocadéro & Champ-de-Mars - Vue prise du Trocadéro


A painter who specialized in views of Paris, Georges Stein was an artist who transcribed perfectly the ambiance, elegance and gaiety of the Belle Epoque. In his many works in oil and watercolor, Stein represented views emblematic of the French capital: the Champs-Elysees, Ile de la Cité, and all of the grand boulevards. These he peopled with elegant carriages, well-turned-out young women, chevaliers in uniform, bicyclists, and other Belle Epoque types. His works serve as a visual record of the costume, manners and public leisure of Paris.
(schillerandbodo.com)