Wednesday, August 31, 2011

ONE OF "OUR BEST MODERN DUTCH PAINTERS"



Lodewijk (Louis) Franciscus Hendrik Apol was born in The Hague on 6 september 1850. At fifteen years old he became the apprentice of the painter Hoppenbrouwers. Charles Rochussen, the teacher of Breitner also frequented the workshop of Hoppenbrouwers and the young Apol must have learned a lot from watching these two masters work together and the discussions between them. After Hoppenbrouwers passed away, already in 1866, the cattle painter Pieter Stortenbeker took over as the young Apol’s teacher. Louis Apol showed a remarkable talent and already at 25 one of his pieces, a sunset in a snow covered forest called A January Evening in The Hague Woods, was exhibited in the Rijksmuseum.
(lesliesmith.nl)


Wood Gatherers on A Country Lane In Winter
From artclon.com


A Snow covered Forest with a Bridge across a Stream
From artclon.com


Figures In A Winter Landscape At Dusk
From artchooser.com


Bachlauf im Winterwald
From van-ham.com


A Cottage in a Snowy Landscape
From ARC at artrenewal.org


Figures by a windmill in a snow covered landscape
From ARC at artrenewal.org


Alte Kuns
From van-ham.com


Sneeuwlandschap
From celesco.nl


Carriage Approaching in a Winter Landscape
From alazraki.com


In Carriage Approaching in a Winter Landscape, above, Apol takes up his favored subject of a snowy landscape. At center of the composition is a quiet road, lined with tall, bare trees. A covered carriage drawn by a white horse approaches at a slow walk toward the viewer. Beyond the road lie flat, rural fields dotted with trees and a single house at the right of the composition. The entire scene is painted in muted, harmonious color that augments the calm, quiet aura of the image. Snow and clouds are painted in tones of white, pale blue, yellow, lavender, silver, and pink. Trees and shrubbery in tones of olive, brown, beige, gray, and gold break the pale, snowy fields. A fine impasto and brushy technique enhances the texture of the dry, dead grasses and branches, revealing patches of light snow upon layers of ice and water. It is this adeptness at painting precisely these types of landscape views that made Apol sought after in both his own country and internationally.
(alazraki.com)


Sun
From artmight.com


Sun
From artmight.com


A Late Afternoon In Winter
From artclon.com


Apol demonstrated a remarkable natural talent for painting at an early age. Encouraged by his father, he began taking private lessons as a child. Whilst greatly influenced, both technically and artistically, by his first master’s choice of genre, Apol soon departed from the figure populated winter scenes favoured by Hoppenbrouwers and Andreas Schelfhout (1787-1870) – a tradition which dated back to fourteenth century illuminated manuscripts and Books of Hours and evolved through artists such as Pieter Breughel the Elder (c.1525-1569) and Hendrik Avercamp (1585-1634). Alternatively, Apol decided to break with concurrent Dutch conventions and follow Jacob van Ruisdael’s lead as a true winter landscape painter, giving only minor importance to a few, if any, small figures in his outdoor scenes. Following his successful artistic debut at The Hague’s triennial exhibition (1869) with his first exhibited work of a summer forest scene, Apol quickly attracted national and international attention and soon began to exhibit abroad. Shortly after the exhibition, he was granted the Royal Art scholarship by the Dutch King William III to further develop his artistic talents, a decision which was supported by Queen Wilhemina and her mother Emma, who later purchased Apol’s work for their own private collections. However, it was the purchase of one of his monumental mid-winter landscapes, A January Evening in The Hague Woods (c. 1875) by the Rijksmuseum, when Apol was still only 25 years old, which marked the official recognition of his contribution to the genre – a work which John Gram considered to be “one of the foundation stones of Modern Art in Holland”.
(frostandreed.com)


A Ferry in A Summer Landscape
From oceansbridge.com


Occasionally, Apol differed from his loved winter scenes and painted a summery moorland or river landscape. One of the most remarkable events in Apol’s life was his partaking in an expedition to Spitsbergen on the polar schooner Willem Barentsz in the summer of 1880. The ship stranded on a reef. After throwing overboard all ballast, they managed to get the vessel off the reef, but the situation remained perilous. The expedition was aborted and they sailed back to Hammerfest. Sixteen years after this expedition, the director of the Panorama in Amsterdam commissioned Apol to paint his impressions of Nova Zembla on a few large canvases. The exhibition of these pieces drew thousands of people. A few years later, Apol also traveled to the United States, a big trip in those days. Louis Apol moved to Roosendaal, close to the city of Arnhem from 1886 till 1892, where he got married. He kept on returning to The Hague though, his hometown, where he passed away on 22 November 1936.
(lesliesmith.nl)


Schaatsers op de Bosvijver Source home-1.tiscali.nl
 WIKIPEDIA


Apols’s works are kept in the National Museum of Art in Bucarest, the Musée des Beaux-Arts de Caen, the Musée Communal de La Haye, the Boymans Museum in Rotterdam, as well as museums in Amsterdam, Montreal, and Munich. (alazraki.com)


Tuesday, August 30, 2011

JETER, 'THE JET'




Carmelita Jeter
From runnerspace.com


Carmelita Jeter 4
World Challenge, Kingston in Jamaica
From nzz.ch/nachrichten


Carmelita Jeter (born November 24, 1979) is an American sprinter who specializes in the 100 meters. After a successful collegiate track career, a hamstring injury hampered much of Jeter's early professional career. She came to prominence in 2007, winning the 100 m bronze at the 2007 World Championships in Athletics and gold at the World Athletics Final. She failed to make the American squad for the 2008 Beijing Olympics. 
The following year she won a second World Championship bronze. However, greater performances followed, winning her second gold of the World Athletics Final in 10.67 seconds and winning the Shanghai Golden Grand Prix in 10.64 seconds after that. This made her the second fastest woman ever in the 100 m, beating Marion Jones's best and bringing her closer to Florence Griffith-Joyner's long standing world record. Currently she holds three of the top ten times ever run.
(WIKIPEDIA)


Carmelita Jeter
(From Malibu MAGAZINE at malibumag.com)


Being the second-fastest woman in history to run the 100-meter dash with a record time of 10.64 seconds, it is no wonder that Carmelita Jeter was born with the word ‘Jet’ in her name. Jeter has won several medals in the 100-meter and 200-meter at the World Championships, the USA Championships and the Olympic trials to name a few.
Jeter was born in Gardena, Calif., and graduated from Cal State Dominguez Hills. The All-American athlete is herself a treasured trophy to CSDH, as she has won the most medals for track and field in the history of the university.
(Malibu MAGAZINE at malibumag.com)


Carmelita Jeter
Fourth fastest finisher in the heats of the women's 100m dash
2008 U.S. Olympic Team Trials
Hayward Field in Eugene
Photo by Thomas Boyd / The Oregonian at oregonianphoto.com


In 2008, Jeter competed at the 100 and 200 m U.S. Olympic trials. Although she set a 100 m best of 10.97 seconds in the quarter-finals, she did not progress beyond the semifinals, finishing just two hundredths out of the qualifying positions. A sixth place finish in the 200 m meant she had not made the 2008 Summer Olympics team, despite being one of the favorites for selection. She qualified for the 100 and 200 m races at the 2008 World Athletics Final but only managed fourth and fifth place, respectively. She changed coach in November, deciding to work with John Smith, who had previously coached athletes such as Maurice Greene. Smith began completely remodeling Jeter's running style.
(WIKIPEDIA


W100m start Zurich 20009
From all-athletics.com


At the 2009 World Athletics Championships, in Berlin, Jeter was one of the favorites for the gold medal as 10.83 seconds personal best in the semis made her the fastest qualifier for the final. She ended up with her second World Championship bronze medal in the 100 m, however, finishing a tenth of a second behind Fraser and Stewart. The races after the championships proved more successful: she beat strong opposition in the IAAF Golden League meets in Zurich and Brussels with two sub-10.90 runs.
Jeter was also selected to run as part of the US relay team as the anchor runner. However, in their heat, during the change over between Alexandria Anderson and Muna Lee, Lee horrifically injured her leg which caused elimination from the relay event. Jamaica eventually claimed the gold medals
(WIKIPEDIA)


Carmelita Jeter
Doha WICH 2010
From all-athletics.com


Doha WICH 2010
From all-athletics.com


Carmelita Jeter
Wins the women's 100 meter run with a time of 10.70
The Prefontaine Classic Track Meet on Saturday, June 4, 2011
Hayward Field in Eugene, OR
Tyler Tjomsland / The Oregonian at photos.oregonlive.com


Marshevet Myers, Carmelita Jeter, Alexandria Anderson
100 m Final, June 24, 2011
2011 USA Outdoor Track & Field Championships
Eugene, Oregon
washingtonpost.com


Women's 100 meter dash final
2011 USA Outdoor Track & Field Championships
Eugene, Oregon
Photo by Christian Petersen/Getty Images North America
From zimbio.com


Carmelita Jeter
Carmelita Jeter winning her heat in the 100m
AVIVA London Grand Prix (Aug 2011)
From asportsphoto.wordpress.com


Carmelita Jeter
Carmelita Jeter wins the 100m Womens final in a time of 10.93s
AVIVA London Grand Prix (Aug 2011)
From asportsphoto.wordpress.com


Jeter speaks with a southern drawl – "Everybody is like, 'Where are you from?' I'm like, LA!" she laughs. It's not the only assumption made about her. Being the fastest woman alive in a discipline so tainted by drugs invites a measure of skepticism and Jeter coolly pre-empts the inevitable questions about doping. "I got so much negative press after I ran 10.64 like, 'Is she clean? Is she this? Is she that?'". She is realistic enough to concede that running faster than the convicted drugs cheat Marion Jones and closest to Griffith-Joyner is going to raise eyebrows – perhaps even among fellow competitors. After the Beijing Olympics the Jamaican Veronica Campbell said even 10.6 was out of reach. "How many have even run 10.6 in the past 20 years since Flo Jo set that record?" she asked. The answer, before Jeter did so, was only the disgraced Jones.
"You know that's honestly the first thing I heard after that race," says Jeter now. "It was like 'Well she's faster than Marion and a little slower than Flo-Jo, hmm.'" She purses her lips. "I look at it like this; I surround myself with people that care about me. They know I'm going to practice every day, that I'm in the weight room every day, that I'm working my butt off. The other people I don't have time for. You can whisper under your breath all you want but I don't give an s-h-i-t. It's unfortunate that I work this hard and I don't get the credit I should get but that's life."
Being thick-skinned is her only option. In the online forums, speculation over her improved performances – prior to 2008 she had not run below 11 seconds – is rife, with bloggers comparing before and after photos of her musculature. The comments are hurtful. "My grandmother called me one day, crying. She watched one of my races on YouTube and she read the comments underneath it. She said, 'Why are these people calling you this and that?' I was like, 'Grandma, stop reading the comments please'. She was very emotional, she was a mess. I had to calm her down. That day was the worst, she had me crying."
But from her family she gains her strength. "My dad always says when people stop talking about you that's when you're not doing anything. In 2008 I wasn't running good and there was nobody talking about me. When you start running well everybody will talk about you. Good and bad your name's in somebody's mouth, so I'm like, 'Hey, keep my name in your mouth!' When you stop talking about me that's when I'm going to worry.
"I can't be upset about those questions because we have a person who everybody adored for years and then she got caught in a scandal (Jones). Then we have another person who everybody adored but there's a lot of, 'he said, she said' about them (Flo-Jo). I mean I understand that I'm in the middle of them. But there's nothing I can do about it. What do you want me to do? Run slow?"
(Carmelita Jeter bears the burden of being the fastest woman alive by Anna Kessel at guardian.co.uk)

Achievements:
2 x World Championships Bronze medallist
1 x World Indoor Championships Bronze medallist
2 x World Athletics Final Gold medallist
2 x World Championships finalist
1 x Diamond League meeting winner
3 x Golden League meeting winner

Personal Bests:
23.02.2002 50m ind. 6.69 Los Angeles (USA)
21.01.2008 55m ind. 6.84 Fresno (USA)
28.02.2010 60M ind. 7.02 Albuquerque (USA)
20.09.2009 100m 10.64 +1.2 Shanghai (CHN)
22.07.2011 200m 22.20 -0.4 Monaco (MON)
18.01.2003 200m ind. 25.33 Nampa (USA)
04.04.2009 400m 53.08 Los Angeles (USA)
01.09.2007 4x100m 42.24 Osaka (JPN)
(all-athletics.com)

CAREER HIGHLIGHTS:
2011: USA Outdoor champion in the 100m (10.74)... 2nd at USA Outdoors in the 200m... 1st at Stockholm (11.15)... 1st at London (10.93)... 1st at Pre Classic (10.70)... 1st at Monaco in 200m (22.20)... 2nd at Doha (10.95)... 3rd at Birmingham in the 200m (22.62)
2010: 3rd at World Indoors (7.05)...USA Indoor champion (7.02)...3rd at Pre Classic (10.83)... 1st at Lausanne (10.99)...1st at Gateshead (10.95)...1st at Kingston (10.94)...1st at Daegu (11.00)...1st at Shanghai (11.09)...1st at Monaco (10.82)...1st at Oslo at the 200m (22.54)...ranked #1 in the world by T&FN…best of 10.82.
2009: 3rd at World Champs (10.90)...USA Outdoor champion (10.78w)…1st at Nike Prefontaine Classic (10.85w)...1st at adidas Track Classic (11.09)...1st at Reebok Grand Prix (10.85w)...1st at Mt. SAC (10.96PR)...1st at Brussels (10.88)...1st at World Athletic Final (10.67PR)...1st at Shanghai (10.64PR)...1st at Daegu (10.83)...best of 10.64.
2008: 6th at Olympic Trials in 200m (22.35)...9th in Olympic Trials semi-finals in 100m (11.05)...5th in 100m at Nike Prefontaine Classic (11.07)…2nd in 200m (22.65) and 6th in 100m (11.16) at Reebok Grand prix…2nd in 200m (22.47) and 5th in 100m (11.26) at adidas Track Classic...ranked #6 in the U.S. by T&FN...best of 11.05.
2007: 3rd at World Outdoors (11.02PR)...3rd in 100m at USA Outdoors (11.17)…USA Indoor 60m runner-up (7.17)…4th in 100m at adidas Track Classic (11.05PR)…1st in 100m at Mt. SAC Relays (11.16)…1st in 100m and 200m at Oxy Invitational (11.22, 22.82PR)…2nd in 100m at Monaco (11.11)…2nd in 100m at Heusden (11.05w)…1st in 60m at Azusa Pacific Qualifier (7.16)...ranked #3 in the world (#2 U.S.) by T&FN...bests of 11.02 and 22.82.
2006: USATF National Club championships 100m runner-up (11.49), 200m champion (23.67PR)…8th in 100m at adidas Track Classic (11.59)…2nd in 100m at Oxy Invitational (11.48)…3rd in 100m at Steve Scott Invitational (11.65)…3rd in 100m at Mt. SAC Relays (11.60)…Claremont Classic 100m runner-up (11.65), 200m champion (23.81)
2005: Did not compete (Injured)
2004: Claremont Classic 100m runner-up (11.80), 200m runner-up (24.33)…Southern California Association Age-Group champs 100m champion (11.74), 200m champion (24.02)
2003: NCAA Div. II 100m runner-up (11.79), 3rd in 200m (23.67PR)
(USA TRACK & FIELD at usatf.org)


Saturday, August 27, 2011

WISDOM AND DESTINY



Misery is the disease of mankind, as disease is the misery of man. And even as there are physicians for disease, so should there be physicians for human misery.
Humanity up to this day has been like an invalid tossing and turning on his couch in search of repose; but therefore none the less have words of true consolation come only from those who spoke as though man were freed from all pain. For, as man was created for health, so was mankind created for happiness; and to speak of its misery only, though that misery be everywhere and seem everlasting, is only to say words that fall lightly and soon are forgotten. Why not speak as though mankind were always on the eve of great certitude, of great joy? Thither, in truth, is man led by his instinct, though he never may live to behold the long-wished-for to-morrow. It is well to believe that there needs but a little more thought, a little more courage, more love, more devotion to life, a little more eagerness, one day to fling open wide the portals of joy and of truth. And this thing may still come to pass. Let us hope that one day all mankind will be happy and wise; and though this day never should dawn, to have hoped for it cannot be wrong. And in any event, it is helpful to speak of happiness to those who are sad, that thus at least they may learn what it is that happiness means.
Many things happen that seem unjust to us; but of all the achievements of reason there has been none so helpful as the discovery of the loftier reason that underlies the misdeeds of nature. It is from the slow and gradual vindication of the unknown force that we deemed at first to be pitiless, that our moral and physical life has derived its chief prop and support. If a race disappears that conforms with our every ideal, it will be only because our ideal still falls short of the grand ideal, which is, as we have said, the intimate truth of the universe.
Our own experience has taught us that even in this world of reality there exist dreams and desires, thoughts and feelings of beauty, of justice, and love, that are of the noblest and loftiest. As you climb up a mountain towards nightfall, the trees and the houses, the steeple, the fields and the orchards, the road, and even the river, will gradually dwindle and fade, and at last disappear in the gloom that steals over the valley. But the threads of light that shines from the houses of men and pierce through the blackest of nights, these shine on undimmed. And every step that you take to the summit reveals but more lights, and more, in the hamlets asleep at your foot. For light, though so fragile, is perhaps the one thing of all that yields naught of itself as it faces immensity. Thus it is with our moral light too, when we look upon life from some slight elevation. It is well that reflection should teach us to disburden our soul of base passions; but it should not discourage, or weaken, our humblest desire for justice, for truth, and for love.
The life of most men will be saddened or lightened by the thing that may chance to befall them. Whatever may happen is lit up by their inward life. When you love, it is not your love that forms part of your destiny; but the knowledge of self that you will have found, deep down in your love—this it is that will help to fashion your life. If you have been deceived, it is not the deception that matters, but the forgiveness whereto it gave birth in your soul, and the loftiness, wisdom, completeness of this forgiveness—by these shall your life be steered to destiny's haven of brightness and peace; by these shall your eyes see more clearly than if all men had ever been faithful. But if, by this act of deceit, there have come not more simpleness, loftier faith, wider range to your love, then have you been deceived in vain, and may truly say nothing has happened.
Let us always remember that nothing befalls us that is not of the nature of ourselves. There comes no adventure but wears to our soul the shape of our everyday thoughts; and deeds of heroism are but offered to those who, for many long years, have been heroes in obscurity and silence. And whether you climb up the mountain or go down the hill to the valley, whether you journey to the end of the world or merely walk round your house, none but yourself shall you meet on the highway of fate.
As we go deeper down into life we discover the secret of more and more sorrow and helplessness. We see that many souls round us lead idle and foolish lives, because they believe they are useless, unnoticed by all, unloved, and convinced they have nothing within them that is worthy of love.
The inner life, perhaps, is not what we deem it to be. There are as many kinds of inner lives as there are of external lives. Into these tranquil regions the smallest may enter as readily as he who is greatest, for the gate that leads thither is not always the gate of the intellect.
There are some that, bereft of initiative or of intelligence, never discover the path that leads into themselves, and are never aware of all that their refuge contains; and yet will their actions be wholly the same as the actions of those whose intellect weighs every treasure. There are some who desire only good, though they know not wherefore they desire it, and have no suspicion that goodness is the one fixed star of loftiest consciousness. The inner life begins when the soul becomes good, and not when the intellect ripens. It is somewhat strange that this inner life can never be formed out of evil. No inner life is for him whose soul is bereft of all nobleness.
Men of inferior degree, it is true, are not given to judging themselves, and therefore is it that fate passes judgment upon them. They are the slaves of a destiny of almost unvarying sternness, for it is only when man has been judged by himself that destiny can be transformed. Men such as these will not master, or alter within them, the event that they meet; nay, they themselves become morally transformed by the very first thing that draws near them. If misfortune befalls them, they grovel before it and stoop down to its level; and misfortune, with them, would seem always to wear its poorest and commonest aspect. They see the finger of fate in every least thing that may happen—be it choice of profession, a friendship that greets them, a woman who passes, and smiles. To them chance and destiny always are one; but chance will be seldom propitious if accepted as destiny. Hostile forces at once take possession of all that is vacant within us, nor filled by the strength of our soul; and whatever is void in the heart or the mind becomes a fountain of fatal influence.
Pronounce the word "destiny," and in the minds of all men an image arises of gloom and of terror—of death. In their thoughts they regard it, instinctively, as the lane that leads straight to the tomb. Most often, indeed, it is only the name that they give unto death, when its hand is not visible yet. It is death that looms in the future, the shadow of death upon life. "None can escape his destiny" we often exclaim when we hear of death lying in wait for the traveler at the bend of the road. But were the traveler to encounter happiness instead, we would never ascribe this to destiny; if we did, we should have in our mind a far different goddess. And yet, are not joys to be met with on the highways of life that are greater than any misfortune, more momentous even than death? May happiness not be encountered that the eye cannot see? And is it not of the nature of happiness to be less manifest than misfortune, to become ever less apparent to the eye as it reaches loftier heights? But to this we refuse to pay heed. The whole village, the town, will flock to the spot where some wretched adventure takes place; but there are none will pause for an instant and let their eyes rest on a kiss, or a vision of beauty that gladdens the soul, a ray of love that illumines the heart. We are unjust; we never associate destiny with happiness; and if we do not regard it as being inseparable from death, it is only to connect it with disaster even greater than death itself.
It is wrong to think of destiny only in connection with death and disaster. When shall we cease to believe that death, and not life, is important; that misfortune is greater than happiness? Why, when we try to sum up a man's destiny, keep our eyes fixed only on the tears that he shed, and never on the smiles of his joy? Where have we learned that death fixes the value of life, and not life that of death?
Does death occupy more space in life than birth? Yet do you not take the sage's birth into account as you ponder over his destiny. Happiness or unhappiness arises from all that we do from the day of our birth to the day of our death; and it is not in death, but indeed in the days and the years that precede it, that we can discover a man's true happiness or sorrow—in a word, his destiny. We seem to imagine that the sage, whose terrible death is written in history, spent all his life in sad anticipation of the end his wisdom prepared; whereas in reality, the thought of death troubles the wise far less than it troubles the wicked. But it is difficult for us not to believe that a wound, that bleeds a few hours, must crumble away into nothingness all the peace of a lifetime.
We are less just than destiny even, when it is destiny that we judge. Our eyes see only the sage's misfortune, for misfortune is known to us all; but we see not his happiness, for to understand the happiness of the wise and the just whose destinies we endeavor to gauge, we must needs be possessed of wisdom and justice that shall be fully equal to theirs. When a man of inferior soul endeavors to estimate a great sage's happiness, this happiness flows through his fingers like water; yet is it heavy as gold, and as brilliant as gold, in the hand of a brother sage. For to each is the happiness given that he can best understand. The sage's misfortune may often resemble the one that befalls other men; but his happiness has nothing in common with that which he who is not wise terms happiness. In happiness there are far more regions unknown than there are in misfortune. The voice of misfortune is ever the same; happiness becomes the more silent as it penetrates deeper.
There are some who are wholly unable to support the burden of joy. There is courage of happiness as well as a courage of sorrow. It may even be true that permanent happiness calls for more strength in man than permanent sorrow; for the heart wherein wisdom is not delights more in the expectation of that which it has not yet, than in the full possession of all it has ever desired. He in whom happiness dwells is amazed at the heart that finds aliment only in fear or in hope, and that cannot be nourished on what it possesses, though it possess all it ever desired.
Evil at times would seem compelled to beg a ray of light from virtue, to shed luster on its triumph. Is it possible for a man to smile in his hatred and not borrow the smile of love? But the smile will be short-lived, for here, as everywhere, there is no inner injustice. Within the soul the high-water mark of happiness is always level with that of justice or charity. The man who goes forth to seek his happiness in evil does merely prove thereby that he is less happy than the other who watches, and disapproves. And yet his object is identical with that of the upright man. He too is in search of happiness, of some sort of peace and certainty. Of what avail to punish him for we do not blame the poor because their home is not a palace.
We are not wrong, perhaps, to be heedful of justice in the midst of a universe that heeds not at all; as the bee is not wrong to make honey in a world that itself can make none. But we are wrong to desire an external justice, since we know that it does not exist. Let that which is in us sufficed. All is forever being weighed and judged in our soul. It is we who shall judge ourselves; or rather, our happiness is our judge.
(Adapted from The Project Gutenberg EBook of Wisdom and Destiny, by Maurice Maeterlinck)



Wednesday, August 24, 2011

FIRST PORTRAIT PAINTER OF THE IMPERIAL COURT




George Dawe at work
Author Райт (гравюра на стали), автор рисунка неизвестен
Source dlib.rsl.ru
From WIKIPEDIA


George Dawe (6 February 1781, St James's, Westminster – 15 October 1829, Kentish Town) was an English portraitist who painted 329 portraits of Russian generals active during Napoleon's invasion of Russia for the Military Gallery of the Winter Palace. He relocated to Saint Petersburg in 1819, where he won acclaim for his work from the artistic establishment and complimentary verses by Pushkin.
He was the son of Philip Dawe, a successful mezzotint engraver who also produced political cartoons relating to the events of the Boston Tea Party. One of his brothers was Henry Edward Dawe, also a portraitist.
(WIKIPEDIA)
Dawe was known in Europe as a fashionable portraitist and master of engravings. He also produced canvases on historical and mythological themes as well as genre paintings in the spirit of sentimental Romanticism. Dawe painted portraits of English generals who distinguished themselves in the Battle of Waterloo. In 1818 the artist was present in Aachen at the Congress of the heads of the states that entered the Holy Alliance. There he was introduced to Alexander I and the Russian emperor invited him to Russia to work on the portraits for the War Gallery of 1812 in the Winter Palace.
(hermitagemuseum.org)
He collected old masters and studied modern and classical languages, philosophy and literature. He also studied anatomy as part of his pursuit of a better understanding of the human form and also undertook human dissections in his own home as well as attending operations to improve his knowledge of the human body.
His classical painting subjects won much praise and were the making of his early reputation but he was more interested in financial success and sought portraiture commissions which were lucrative and which brought him into contact with high society. However, the direct way in which he promoted his own work was not approved of by artistic society and brought considerable criticism from his contemporaries, one of whom was Constable who painted a background for a Dawe portrait on at least one occasion.
(wapedia.mobi)
Dawe originally trained with his father as an engraver. He later became interested in painting and went on to study at the RA. He produced canvases on historical and mythological themes, as well as genre paintings in the spirit of sentimental Romanticism. He enjoyed the patronage of the Duke and Duchess of Kent and also that of Princess Charlotte and Prince Leopold. In 1819 he travelled with the Duke of Kent on a tour of Europe. His painting of portraits of military staff and diplomats brought him to the attention of Tsar Alexander I, who commissioned him to paint the portraits of the senior military staff, who had led the Russians in their resistance to Napoleon’s invasion.
(drawpaintsculpt.com)


Portrait of General Pyotr Bagration (1765-1812)
Oil on canvas, 1825
From oceansbridge.com


The artist managed to create a memorable image of one of the most glorious Russian military leaders (above). Pyotr Bagration (1765-1812) was a prince, descended from the Georgian ruling family, but without a powerful patron or money to buy a position, and thus he began his military career as an ordinary infantry soldier. It took him 11 years to reach the rank of Major, being promoted solely thanks to his military talents. He was famed for remaining cool-headed in the most dangerous situations and for always taking calm, measured decisions; at the same time he was renowned for great personal bravery. Both Count Alexander Suvorov and Mikhail Kutuzov, the most famous of all Russian military leaders, placed Bagration in the most dangerous situations, where they knew it would be necessary to fight against overwhelming odds. He made his name during the Russo-Turkish War of 1787 to 1791, and went on to fight in Suvorov's Italian and Swiss campaigns (1799), against Napoleon in 1805 and 1806-7, and in the Russo-Swedish War of 1808-9. But the peak of his glory was the Battle of Borodino on 26 August 1812, which determined the outcome of the war against Napoleon. The battle lasted 6 hours and Bagration received a fatal wound, dying three weeks later. In this portrait, Bagration is shown wearing a general's uniform decorated with a pattern of oak leaves embroidered in gold thread: this uniform was worn before going into battles which were to be decisive.
(hermitagemuseum.org)


Dawe’s unfinished Portrait of Admiral Alexander Shishkov
From drawpaintsculpt.com


The Portrait of Admiral Alexander Shishkov (above) is one of the best canvases George Dawe produced in Russia apart from his main work to order - the portraits of Russian generals for the War Gallery of 1812. For some unknown reason the portrait remained unfinished. Dawe not only precisely conveyed likeness but also revealed the imperious, vigorous and stern character of his sitter.
Alexander Shishkov (1754-1841) was an outstanding statesman and man of letters. In his youth he several times navigated as a naval officer. In 1795 he published a Nautical Dictionary in Russian, English and French. In 1810 Shishkov initiated the foundation of the "Conversation of the Lovers of Russian Language" society. During the Russian campaigns against Napoleon in 1812-14, Shishkov accompanied Alexander I and wrote for him all the manifestoes, decrees and speeches, which promoted the raising of patriotic feelings. He occupied important state posts as President of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Minister for Education (1824-28) and member of the State Council. He adhered to conservative views in politics.
(hermitagemuseum.org)


Portrait of Pyotr M. Volkonsky
Oil on canvas, 1823
Current Loc Hermitage Museum
Source Web Gallery of Art
From WIKIMEDIA


Portrait of Pavel A Stroganov(1772-1817)
Oil on canvas, 1825
From oceansbridge.com


Portrait of Alexander Prince of Wurttemberg (1771-1833)
Oil on canvas, 1825
From artclon.com


Portrait of Alexander I Ostermann-Tolstoy (1770-1857)
Oil on canvas, 1825
From artclon.com


Alexander Langeron
Oil on canvas, 1825
From firstempire.0catch.com


Portrait of Dmitry V. Golitsyn (1771-1844)
Oil on canvas, 1825
Current Loc Hermitage Museum
Source Web Gallery of Art
From WIKIMEDIA


Portrait of Stanislav S. Pototsky (1787-1831)
Oil on canvas, 1825
From sanjeev.net


Portrait of Alexander P. Kutuzov
Current Loc hermitage Museum
Source Web Gallery of Art
WIKIMEDIA COMMONS


Portrait of Alexander F. Shcherbatov (1772-1817)
Oil on canvas, 1826
From oceansbridge.com


Portrait of Andrey Maslov
From arthermitage.org


Portrait of Andrey V Bogdanosky (1780-1864)
Oil on canvas, 1832
From io.ua


Portrait of Vasily G Kotenetsky (1769-1831)
From io.ua


The glorified military commanders of the Patriotic War of 1812 look down on us from the portraits on the walls of the War Gallery of 1812 with their handsome and brave faces "full of military courage", as Alexander Pushkin wrote about them. The dark fabric of their uniforms sets off their bright military decorations and the irridescent moire of the ribbons of their orders. The heroes painted by George Dawe with great virtuosity look amazingly alive.
Emperor Alexander I personally approved the list of generals, presented by the General Staff, whose portraits were to adorn the War Gallery of 1812. These were 349 participants in the Patriotic War of 1812 and the campaigns abroad of 1813-1814 who held the rank of general or were promoted to general shortly after the end of the war.
During the 10 years of their work George Dawe and his Russian assistants Vasily (Wilhelm) Golike and Alexander Polyakov had created 333 portraits which were put up in 5 rows on the walls of the Gallery. For various reasons 13 portraits remained unfinished. Instead of them there are frames with the names of the generals.
The whole of Russia knew the names of those whose portraits were placed in the War Gallery of 1812. One could write a heroic ode to each of them.
(hermitagemuseum.org)
Dawe became an international celebrity throughout Europe and mixed with the Russian intellectual elite. Among others he met and knew were Pushkin who wrote a poem about him entitled "To Dawe Esq." In 1826 Nicholas I invited him to his coronation ceremony and in 1828 he was officially appointed as First Portrait Painter of the Imperial Court.
He returned to England in 1828 and stayed for several months. During this time he exhibited many of his recent works and George IV was among those to whom they were privately shown.
(wapedia.mobi)
Dawe collected Old Masters and studied modern and Classical languages, philosophy and literature. He also studied anatomy and undertook human dissections in his own home, as well as attending operations to improve his knowledge of the human body.
He returned to St Petersburg in February 1829 to produce a life-size portrait of Grand Duke Konstantin Pavlovich, but became unwell with breathing difficulties, following a serious cold. He suffered from pulmonary weakness, following a childhood illness. He returned to London in August 1829 and died on 15 October at the Kentish Town home of his brother-in-law, Thomas Wright.
(drawpaintsculpt.com)
Dawe is now the least celebrated of the major late Georgian portrait painters in spite of being compared in his lifetime with both Thomas Lawrence and Jacques-Louis David. Undoubtedly, his removal from London at a vital period of his career left the field entirely clear for Lawrence, whose only clear rival he was. Dawe certainly made a rapid impression in Russia with Pushkin dedicating the following verse to him:
Why does your wondrous pencil strive
My Moorish profile to elicit?
Your art will help it to survive,
But Mephistopheles will hiss it.

Draw Miss Olenin's face. To serve
His blazing inspiration's duty,
The genius should spend his verve
On homage but to youth and beauty.
(MASTERART at masterart.com)



Sunday, August 21, 2011

THE MASTER OF THE 'DECISIVE MOMENT'





Elliott Erwitt
By Nicolas Megoran at nicmegoran.wordpress.com


Elliott Erwitt is an advertising and documentary photographer known for his black and white candid shots of ironic and absurd situations within everyday settings—the master of the "decisive moment".
(WIKIPEDIA)
Born in Paris in 1928 to parents who had emigrated there from Russia, much of Mr. Erwitt’s first 10 years were spent in Italy. In 1938 his parents returned to Paris. Their stay was short-lived, however, as his father was Jewish and the approach of World War II and Hitler’s armies factored heavily into the family’s decision to leave Europe. They sailed to the United States, settling in Los Angeles.
(Tom Clavin at 27east.com)
Erwitt’s linguistic facility – he also speaks French and some Russian – is the legacy of his nomadic childhood. His Russian-Jewish family lived in Milan before fleeing Mussolini in 1938. After spells in France and New York, they settled in Los Angeles in 1941.
It should have been the beginning of the American Dream but the reality was grittier. His parents divorced and, although his father got custody, Erwitt senior subsequently skipped town to avoid alimony payments. “At the age of 15, I was on my own and had to fend for myself,” recalls the snowy-haired photographer.
He found work processing celebrity prints in a Hollywood darkroom, and started taking his own snaps with no idea that his talent was out of the ordinary. “I just did it. It evolved.”
Touchingly, Erwitt is devoid of bitterness at his father’s betrayal. He describes him as “a wonderful man” who, after working as “an engineer, a not very good businessman and a Buddhist priest”, became a photographer himself. “He said he wanted ‘to follow in the footsteps of his son’.”
Erwitt père had a tough act to follow. Erwitt is one of the most respected photographers of a generation that encompasses Robert Frank, Diane Arbus and Lee Friedlander. He has published more than 30 books, made numerous documentary films and exhibited in venues including MoMA and the Palais de Tokyo in Paris. Yet he remains the most shy and self-deprecating of characters. He describes his 60-year career as “a pleasant experience”;
(Rachel Spence at FINACIAL TIMES at ft.com)
Mr. Erwitt attended Hollywood High School and Los Angeles City College, and it was during these years that his infatuation with photography began. As many talented and ambitious young people did after the war, he headed east, to New York, where he took photography courses at the New School for Social Research.
Further training was provided by the U.S. Army after Mr. Erwitt was drafted. He served as a photographer’s assistant during his time in the military.
Returning to civilian life in New York, Mr. Erwitt fell in with Edward Steichen, Robert Capa and a few other notable photographers. He was then hired to shoot commercial photography projects and his work also appeared in Life and Look magazines and other national publications.
The influence of the legendary French photographer Henri Cartier-Bresson can be seen in much of Mr. Erwitt’s most famous photos, shots taken at what has been called the “decisive moment.” Such photos were taken right when something happened, someone was wearing a particular expression, or there was a humorous juxtaposition of people or people and animals.
(Tom Clavin at 27east.com)


USA California, 1955
From kunstmeranoarte.org


Jacqueline Kennedy at John F. Kennedy's Funeral
From allartnews.com


Marilyn Monroe, 1956
From kunstmeranoarte.org


Marilyn Monroe, 1956
From theworldofphotographers.wordpress.com


The Misfits
From thisismarilyn.com


Fidel Castro
Elliott Erwitt/Magnum Photos
From nytimes.com


USSR Moscow, 1957
By Nicolas Megoran at nicmegoran.wordpress.com


Interesting story behind this photo (above) as it was taken in Moscow in 1957. The Height of Marcrthyism in America and just after high Stalinism. He could not take the film out of the country as the Russians would X ray his baggage and ruin the film. This photo Elliot had to develop in Russia in a bath and take the footage to Helsinki to Wire across to America. This Photo appeared everywhere in the news media. At a time of little information about the secretive nation this image said a lot.
(Nicolas Megoran at nicmegoran.wordpress.com)


V President Nixon and Soviet P Minister Nikita Kruschev, 1959
From phaidon.com


V President Nixon and Soviet P Minister Nikita Kruschev, 1959
By Nicolas Megoran at nicmegoran.wordpress.com


Many of Erwitt’s photographs were taken as commercial assignments, so he did not necessarily choose the subjects in those instances. Those assignments did allow him to take pictures of some pretty incredible things, like Marilyn Monroe, Fidel Castro and the infamous “kitchen debate” between Nixon and Khrushchev  (above). And his knack for communicating the feeling of a moment applied to his commercial work as well.
The tension of this moment is palpable; you can really feel the intensity of the argument with the scene that Erwitt has captured. Every subject in the composition is essential to the feel of the photo. This picture makes Nixon seem like a rather imposing figure. He comes across as the larger man in proportion to Khrushchev. He appears to be imposing his size on him, while pushing his finger into his chest. Meanwhile, Khrushchev appears blasé; he is seemingly unfazed by Nixon’s attempts to intimidate him. The intensity of this scene is only amplified by the look of concentration and concern on the translators face.
This photo of the kitchen debate employs many of the elements of design that make photographs great. First off, Nixon and Khrushchev are aligned on a segment of the ‘rule of thirds’ graph. This makes the picture balanced, and allows for a better sense of the background of the scene. The photo also captures emotions and the unexpected. It is pretty interesting and unexpected for two leaders of powerful countries to be in such a battle of body language. The image of Nixon with his finger buried in Khrushchev’s chest is pretty interesting, considering the cold war environment at the time. The emotions that Erwitt captures in the faces of the people in the composition probably parallel the emotions of the American people at that time.
(jessechimz.wordpress.com)
Elliott Erwitt's photo sequences leave his subjects multiply exposed, as the mood of one frame is shattered in the next. It's all very well for a photograph to still life and immobilizes a moment, but we can't help wondering what comes next, when time resumes and the transfixed bodies stop pretending to be dead.
Elliott Erwitt's sequences reveal the afterlife of photographs, in cinematic jump cuts that show people or animals kinetically recovering from the poses that the camera inflicts on them. Once a tragedy ends, the human comedy is bound to resume.
The old woman in the cemetery goes through the slow motions of grief at the pace of a halting funeral march. She stands in sad contemplation, or bows as she adjusts the flowers on the grave. Her dog – respectful, patient, or perhaps merely bored – sits to make itself comfortable for the duration of the ceremony. Then, in the third frame this ritualized composure breaks down. As soon as the woman trudges away, the dog rolls over to scratch its back and rejoices with its legs in the air. Have the first two frames told us a sentimental lie? The dog probably did not even belong to the grieving woman; otherwise it would have left when she did – unless, of course, it dropped dead in the gap between the second and third exposures. Erwitt's joke is compassionate or cynical according to taste.
(Peter Conrad, the Observer at guardian.co.uk)
Since the 1970s, he has devoted much of his energy toward movies. His feature films, television commercials, and documentary films include "Arthur Penn: the Director" (1970), Beauty Knows No Pain (1971), Red, White and Bluegrass (1973) and the prize-winning Glassmakers of Herat, Afghanistan (1977). He was, as well, credited as Camera Operator for "Gimme Shelter" (1970), Still Photographer for "Bob Dylan: No Direction Home" (2005), and provided Addition Photography for "Get Yer Ya Ya's Out (2009).
(WIKIPEDIA)
Beauty Knows No Pain is a film about the young ladies who come from all over the country to compete in a two-week drill, knowing that not all of them will make the cut. Through the difficult but rewarding process, Miss Davis tries to imbue her charges with enthusiasm, energy, and a non-stop smile.
The latter part of the film focuses on one member from North Dakota, who, in her second year, has embodied all of the spirit the Rangerettes represent. At the end of the two week camp, the girls gather to see who is in, who has been chosen as an alternate, and who will go home unfulfilled. The girls meet their triumph and disappointment with shrieks and tears.
(nationalfilmnetwork.com)
Gimme Shelter is the landmark documentary about the tragically ill-fated Rolling Stones free concert at Altamont Speedway on December 6, 1969. Only four months earlier, Woodstock defined the Love Generation; now it lay in ruins on a desolate racetrack six miles
outside of San Francisco. Before an estimated crowd of 300,000 people, the Stones headlined a free concert featuring
Tina Turner, Jefferson Airplane, The Flying Burrito Brothers and others. Concerned about security, members of outlaw biker gang The Hell's Angels were asked to help maintain order. Instead, an atmosphere of fear and dread arose, leading ultimately to the stabbing death of a fan. What began as a flower-power love-in had degenerated into a near riot; frightened, confused faces wondering how the Love Generation could, in one swift, cold-blooded slash, became a generation of disillusionment and disappointment. December 6, 1969: the day the Sixties died.
(mayslesfilms.com)


Paris 1989 tour Eiffel 100th Anniversary
From kunstmeranoarte.org


The only mildly surprising thing about Elliott Erwitt being given the International Center of Photography’s “2011 Infinity Award for Lifetime Achievement” in May was that it should have been bestowed upon him a lot sooner than two months before his 83rd birthday. And maybe at a time when he wasn’t so busy accepting similar awards.
“I’ve had four of them in the last few months,” said Mr. Erwitt, who lives in East Hampton and Manhattan. He added with his characteristic humor, “They’re piling up. My life must be over. I’m not going to refuse any more of them, though, because you get a free meal and people say nice things about you.”
(Tom Clavin at 27east.com)
With a touch of humor and an eye for the humane, Elliott Erwitt's black and white photographs reveal the most basic and candid human emotions. He developed his vision during the post-war rise of documentary photojournalism, and has captured many of life's most poignant ironies through an amusing vernacular.
His personal work has been published in countless monographs, and he has been a member of the prestigious Magnum agency since 1953. His photographs are collected and exhibited in museums around the world including the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C.; the Art Institute of Chicago; and Kunsthaus, Zurich.
(ROBERT KOCH GALLERY at kochgallery.com)