Saturday, March 31, 2012

MARINA




Sorento
From artnow.ru


Nuova Pagina
From decumanus.net


Italian artist Andrea Patrisi was born in Naples in 1954. Since his youth, Patrisi has had a passion for art and has been intensely active in his artistic work. He has taken part in numerous group and personal exhibits in Italy and abroad with great success. He attended the Art Institute and developed his own distinct style. His bold strokes and moody coloring give each painting its own characteristic appeal. He favors rustic-scenes, landscapes, seascapes, and cityscapes, particularly with canals. The talent and charisma of Patrisi have made him a favorite among collectors. His works can be found in public and private collections around the world.
(galerie-du-soleil.com)


Marina
From decumanus.net


Marina
From artnow.ru


Posillipo
From artnow.ru


Posillipo
From artnow.ru


Capri
From galerie-du-soleil.com


Sorento
From artnow.ru


Seaport
From artnow.ru


Pozzuoli
From artnow.ru


Amalfi
From artnow.ru


Andrea Patrisi paints the stunning scenery of the Amalfi coast with freshness and sincerity, it is an area he knows and loves. He studied at the internationally acclaimed Accademia delle belle Arti Naples. Patrisi’s work was soon in such demand that he could dedicate himself to becoming a full time artist.
Over the years Patrisi has developed a distinctive technique, bold brushstrokes and vivid colours are his signature style. Patrisi’s deep knowledge and understanding of this rugged coastline is fundamental to his honest depictions of this still relatively unspoilt area of Italy. In his paintings of the working fishing harbours you can almost smell the salty fishing nets piled on the decks of the old boats. The once grand classical Palazzi overlooking the bountiful sea are now crumbling and unkempt. One of the most difficult things to paint is water and this is Patrisi’s forte. Light bounces off of his calm seas in which we can see reflections of the proud fishing boats.
(FIUMANO FINE ART at fiumanofineart.com)


Friday, March 30, 2012

MASTER PROPAGANDA ARTIST




Ludwig Hohlwein Portrait
Photo Anton Sahm, Munchen
From c590298.r98.cf2.rackcdn.com


Shortly after the turn of the century Berlin became the center of commerce, and the birth place of the art movement called Plakatstil (poster style). The standout artist/ posterist in Berlin at the birth of this movement was Lucian Bernhard. Bernhard in 1906 was the first to move away from the decorative tendencies of Art Nouveau and focused on one product image combined with bold minimal lettering. This approach became known as the Sachplakat or Object Poster. Plakatstil became an universal style without having any direct links to a specific school or movement. The characteristics of this style were bold lettering, a simple central image, and distinctive eye-catching color. Because this style allowed its message to be easliy accessible it was aesthetically pleasing.
During WWI, Hohlwein produced emotional posters for fundraising and propaganda purposes. Between the wars Hohlwein designed travel posters, getting more involved with photography and airbrushing. During WWII Hohlwein produced War posters for the Nazi's. He became known as a master propaganda artist.
(anneserdesign.com)
Accelerating industrialization in the first decade of the twentieth century turned Germany into a fertile ground for the orientation of art towards industry. The combination of industry and art gets an ideal testing ground in the design of company posters and product advertisements.
In the German “plakatstil” (or poster-style) all ornaments and embellishments are further omitted. The simplification is even more extensive, leaving only taut lines. This leaves us with recognizable pictorial references and a persuasive communication, a style consistent with the commercial and technological demands of the age. This new type of poster soon became far-famed.
(Excerpt from "Ludwig Hohlwein" by Professor H.K. Frenzel at iconofgraphics.com)


Golf in Germany
From barewalls.com


RIQUETTA
From img15.nnm.ru


RIQUETTA
From 2all.co.il


Plakatstil incorporated color combinations not seen in other art forms such as Art Nouveau. Plakatstil shied away from the complexity of Art Nouveau and helped emphasize a more modern outlook on poster art. Plakatstil, German “Poster Style” begun in 1905 by Lucien Bernhard in Berlin and in Munich by Ludwig Hohlwein.
(Plakatstil , 2010 by floppydisc at floppydisc.wordpress.com)
Ludwig Hohlwein (born 27 July 1874 in Wiesbaden - died 15 September 1949 in Berchtesgaden) enjoyed a privileged childhood in a prominent family. While studying architecture at the Technical University in Munich from 1895 onwards, he made his first illustrations for the newspaper of the Academic Architects Association. He designed the association’s program booklets, invitations and book decorations. After his studies in Munich and at the Dresden Academy he undertook study trips to London and Paris. Eventually he settled in Munich as an architect. In addition to the interiors of private homes, he took orders for decorating ocean liners.
In 1901 Ludwig married Leoni Dorr. They had two children. In this period he regularly takes part in exhibitions with his prints, watercolors and tempera paintings in the Munich Glass Palace. He developed his unique style early on in his career which showed little changes over the next forty years. Hohlwein left architecture and started focusing on graphic design in 1906. He began as a poster artist, building up a self-taught style which was primarily influenced by the collage technique of the British Beggarstaff Brothers. He was very productive and quickly gained name and fame in the world of graphics and among important clients.
(Excerpt from "Ludwig Hohlwein" by Professor H.K. Frenzel at iconofgraphics.com)


Direct China Cotton Importers
Wonalancet Company Nashua NH, 1909
From skinnerinc.com


Vintage Car Poster, 1912
From vinmag.com


Plakat Bayern, 1913
From kettererkunst.com


Hermann Scherrer, Tailor, 1913
From periodpaper.com


Kunstdruck Kristallpalast
From cgi.ebay.de


Pelikan, 1913
From floppydisc.files.wordpress.com


Heroic Realism illustration
From anm101w11.files.wordpress.com


Plakat 'Wankbahn, Partenkirchen'
From p2.la-img.com


Wilhelm Mozer
From p2.la-img.com


Kitty Starling, 1914
From periodpaper.com


Rhenania Phosphat
From reklamebox.com


Deutsches Museum Munchen
From antikbar.co.uk


Adler Typewriter Ad Poster
From c590298.r98.cf2.rackcdn.com


Riquet Pralinen, 1920
From floppydisc.files.wordpress.com


Hohlwein's most creative phase of work and a large variety of his best-known posters were created between 1912 and 1925. It was during this critical period that he developed his own unique visual style. By 1925, he had already designed 3,000 different advertisements and became the best-known German commercial artist of his time. Poster historian Alain Weill comments that "Hohlwein was the most prolific and brilliant German posterist of the twentieth century. . . Beginning with his first efforts, Hohlwein found his style with disconcerting facility. It would vary little for the next forty years. The drawing was perfect from the start, nothing seemed alien to him, and in any case, nothing posed a problem for him. His figures are full of touches of color and a play of light and shade that brings them out of their background and gives them substance."
(Richard Poulin, ROCKPAPERINK at rockpaperink.com)


Kunst Im Druck, 1926
From i.allday.ru


Jgeha Schokolade, 1926
From periodpaper.com


Victoria Fahrr├Ąder, 1926
For Victoria-Werke, AG, Nuremberg, Germany
From periodpaper.com


Mannheimer Zeitung Kunstdruck, 1926
From cgi.ebay.de


Winter in Duitsland, 1930
Advertising rail travel to German Wintersport resorts
From originalskiposters.com


Reich vocational competition for German Youth, 1934
From webposters.adm.ntu.edu.sg


Poster 11th Olympic Games Berlin, 1936
From p2.la-img.com


Poster Olympic Winter Games 1936
From sala17.files.wordpress.com


Brochure for a Sporting event, 1936
From creativereview.co.uk


Hohlwein's work relied mostly on strong figurative elements with reductive qualities of high contrast, intense flat color, and bold patterns of geometric elements. This is evident in his iconographic poster for Hermann Scherrer. The figurative element of the man is optically centered in the field of the poster with no apparent horizon line. The well-dressed gentleman and his riding accessories, as well as his pure-bred dog, are all represented in a reductive, stark manner combined with vivid color and an abstract, black-and-white checkerboard pattern. Here, Hohlwein treats this distinctive pattern as a two-dimensional plane. It is in extreme contrast to the surrounding three-dimensional compositional elements, creating a strong and memorable focal point for the poster. His adaptation of photographic images was based on a deep and intuitive understanding of visual design principles. His creative use of color and architectural compositions dispels any suggestion that he used photographs as the basis of his creative output. Additionally, his use of high tonal contrasts, interlocking shapes, and distinctive graphic patterns made his work instantly recognizable and memorable. Aside from Lucian Bernhard, LudwigHohlwein was one of the most successful and celebrated designers of the Plakatstil and Sachplakat modes or "poster" and "object poster" styles in Germany during this time period.
(Richard Poulin, ROCKPAPERINK at rockpaperink.com)


Thursday, March 29, 2012

BUILDING NEW LIVES IN THE WEST


Robert Pummill explains the course his life took from illustrator to western artist, "In rural Ohio, where I grew up, there was little direct art instruction available; correspondence courses were a good alternative. The work of one of the founders of the Famous Artist Course, Harold Von Schmidt, and the text he wrote for the course, had a great impact on my art. After nine years in the military, I studied at the Art Center School of Design in Los Angeles at night and worked as an illustrator during the day. Eventually we settled in Dallas, where I worked as an illustrator fpr Vought Aeronautics, continuing to paint in the evenings and on the weekends, all the while selling my work in the local art galleries. After about eight years and a couple of successful one-man shows, I was able to devote full time to easel painting as of January 1977. We later moved to Kerville, Texas, where we still reside. My choice of western subject matter is the result of a lifelong fascination with the life of the cowboy and the drama of opening and development of the American West. I was elected to membership in the Cowboy Artists of America in 1984."
(BIG HORN GALLERIES at bighorngalleries.com)


American Bison
From claggettrey.com


South Wichita
From claggettrey.com


Old Blue
From greatamericanwestgallery.com


Bosque County
From greatamericanwestgallery.com


In 1977 he became a full time painter at 41. “From these experiences,” he points out, “I acquired discipline and the ability to meet a specific goal, both time-wise and subject-wise. In Western art, just as in commercial art, you have to know what you want to end up with before you begin. The most important aspect of doing a painting is the ability to analyze what is necessary to re-create a mood or feeling.” Featured in magazines such as "Southwest Art," Pummill’s work can also be found in a book on his art, entitled "Under Western Skies."
(Cowboy Artists of America publication, "Cowboy Artists of America," by Michael Duty)


Crossing Pecos Country
From jackassartgallery.com


Over the Top
From jackassartgallery.com


The principal themes of Robert Pummill's work include the settlers' trek West, Native American culture, and the early cattle and transportation industry. His canvases are filled with historical tales of the nineteenth century, a time when Americans were on the move, packing their belongings and crossing the plains in Conestoga wagons. Pummill focuses intensely on details of everything from costume and subject matter to the air and color specific to each region. Since he has lived in a number of places he has gained a perfect understanding of the differences between atmospheres and colors of varied regions, capturing the differences between Texas and Arizona, Colorado and Nevada. He is a skilled draftsman who puts tremendous research into studying locations, costumes, harnesses and vehicles, and then very carefully creates his compositions designing several thumbnail sketches on site to capture colors and arrange figures. Pummill is a diverse artist who is a talented oil painter and watercolorist, as well as a sculptor. Robert Pummill elicits from the worn pages of journals and ledgers visions of history that remind us of the perseverance of the settlers. "The subject of people on the move or building new lives in the West is very fulfilling. Its only limitations are the limitations (the artist) places on it himself." Pummill has become one of the top Cowboy Artists, winning the gold medal in watercolor at the 1995 CA show.
(Peggy and Harold Samuels, Contemporary Western Artists (Bonanza Books, 1985) at beauchampwesternart.com)


A Quiet Spring Day
From insightgallery.com


Pummill has been painting western scenes for more than 40 years. And with an extensive library, he has access to all the research material he needs for accuracy and authenticity. Another major part of his artistic development can be traced to the many years he was employed as a conceptual illustrator. Working in the aeronautics field, for companies such as Vought Aircraft Industries in Dallas, Pummill would take an idea produced by the engineering department, add creativity and artistic talent, and come up with an accurate, attention-grabbing scene to illustrate it.
“I was working with concepts of aircraft that hadn’t even been built yet. I was taught to take the blueprints and create a storyline around them—a plane in combat, for instance,” he recalls. “To create a visual storyline you have to have a fairly vivid imagination and be able to put yourself in the scene.”
In more recent years the artist has put that skill to use researching, envisioning, and depicting experiences such as that of a bone-tired stagecoach driver whose stage is slogging through rim-deep mud after days of rain. Growing up in rural Ohio, Pummill didn’t dream of a career in illustration any more than he imagined a future as a fine-art painter. As a boy he was too busy working, helping out in his father’s restaurant, or doing laboring jobs on nearby farms. There were no professional artists around as role models to give him the notion that it was even possible to make a living with art. Today, while he occasionally works in watercolor or bronze sculpture, Pummill’s primary medium remains oils. He also has found himself circling back to a subject from his earlier years: “As I’ve grown older, I’ve been doing more landscape painting. I’d been neglecting it for a long time and decided to get back into it,” he explains. “It’s food for the soul.”
(Gussie Fauntleroy, SouthwestArt at southwestart.com)


Wednesday, March 28, 2012

MUSICIAN AND DRAWER




Always kept Sharp Eye
SouthwestArt Magazine
From southwestart.com


Old Friends
From cmdudash.com


Although C. Michael Dudash (born 1952) lives in Pennsylvania, his heart currently resides in the Old West—and its more colorful, less complicated times. His paintings OLD FRIENDS (above) and THE LAST HAND smolder with the scent of wood fires, kerosene lamps, tall-grass prairie, and sage. Warm golden tones bestow an antique quality to the work. But Dudash’s roots aren’t quite so far from his western subject matter. He grew up in the small town of Mankato in Minnesota. “I grew up with big sky,” he says. His parents had artistic and musical talent and encouraged their five children’s abilities. His mother attended art school for a year, but chose motherhood instead of an art career. His Hungarian father was a musician and had wanted to be an architect, but applied his creative design and building talents to carpentry. Dudash describes himself as “a life-long musician and drawer.” In addition to painting, he plays guitar and piano. After graduating from high school in 1970, he spent a year at Macalester College in St. Paul as a fine-art major, but left school to pursue music. Five years on the road as a full-time musician took him to New England, where he met his wife-to-be in Vermont. “At that point I decided to go back to my other talent, which was art,” he says. So he returned to Minnesota to attend the Minneapolis College of Art and Design. “I was only in art school for a semester when McGraw-Hill Publishing Co. offered me a job. Although I had some formal art education—life drawing, drafting, and some painting—I had no training as an illustrator. I learned on the job at McGraw-Hill for a year and then was basically on my own.”
(C. Michael Dudash | Accuracy & Emotion by Reed Glenn at southwestart.com)


Wonderful Life Movie Poster
From cmdudash.com


Over the Top Settlers
West Gallery Tucson, AZ
From cmdudash.com


Dudash left the company, and he and his wife, Valerie, moved back to her home state of Vermont. He found an agent in New York and began producing illustrations for Readers Digest, TV Guide, the movie industry, and other outlets. “I started winning awards and was pretty successful. I only planned to do it for a couple of years, because I always wanted to be a painter,” he says. But like one of his inspirations, renowned 20th-century illustrator N.C. Wyeth (father of artist Andrew Wyeth), he met success quickly, and the work and its rewards were too good to pass up—especially since he was now supporting a growing family.
(C. Michael Dudash | Accuracy & Emotion by Reed Glenn at southwestart.com)


The Gift Poster
From beginningartist.com


You create visual surprise by doing something different, something the viewer isn't expecting. Doing the unexpected can draw the viewer into your art, because by not telling the viewer everything, you trigger his or her imagination. Anytime you can involve the viewer's imagination, you make your art much more exciting. C. Michael Dudash very creatively used this idea of simplifying things into simple shapes in his paintings. Take this first example (above)from early in Michael's Dudash's career. It was for a story in Field and Stream or Sports Afield magazine. Michael's technique consisted of applying a thin layer of darker oil paint and then removing it where he wanted light areas. Look at how simply the trees in the background are done – just sky holes here and there. The same is true of the car. By simplifying, he only needed to show strategically placed highlights and your imagination supplies the rest. Notice he used those strategically placed highlights to create a path for your eyes to flow through the painting. Your eyes go first to the man, the star of this picture, and then follow the roof to the left. Then you follow the highlights down to the rear tire. He rubs some paint off to represent grass which brings your eyes back to the man. He created the same sort of path around the front of the car. Mystery and visual surprise everywhere. All from simplifying, painting less, not more, and involving your imagination.
(beginningartist.com)


Sparro - Portrait of a Cowboy Singer
From legacygallery.com


While living in VT, Michael was fortunate to have had the opportunity to paint and study with Richard Schmid and his wife Nancy Guzik. Michael has participated in Richard’s Rist Canyon Art Auction for the last several years as well. “Richard is a wonderful teacher and human being, and I have always appreciated his ability to inspire his friends, fellow artists and collectors.” Michael has had numerous one-man shows and participated in a large number of group shows. He has won awards of excellence in the 2004 & 2005 National Oil Painters of America shows, including best portrait. His recent painting of Wild Bill Hickok was purchased by the Pearce Western Art Museum for its permanent collection. He has conducted workshops at his studio and in several locations including Los Angeles, Dallas & San Antonio, TX, Columbus, OH, and Tokyo, Japan. His ever growing number of corporate and individual collectors appreciate the draftsmanship, use of light and colorful atmosphere that Michael is able to bring to his work. Although he has increasingly been turning his attention to painting the characters and history of the old west, Michael still loves to paint the variety of subjects that he finds around him, and is equally adept at masterfully handling landscapes, figures, portraits and still lifes.
(legacygallery.com)


Green Pastures

His smile was sure friendly

Sisters

Sagebrush Trail
All images from saksgalleries.com


“I have always been interested in well executed and beautifully designed oil painting, no matter what the venue, style or label.” Michael says. “Most artists, myself included, can count dozens of incredible representational painters who have come before us as positive influences and teachers. Although often the most important, subject matter is only a part of the painting. The challenge for a painter is to take his subject of interest and create works of art that are moving, beautiful, timeless and universal in their appeal. As for me, I have to daily rely on the good Lord and His inspiration to help me accomplish this formidable task.” Although trained in the fine arts, his decision to begin a career in classic illustration won him a prestigious and national reputation, with his numerous awards and hundreds of Clients being far too many to list. His transition back into fine art was the natural course for Michael, as his influences as an oil painter have always been the classical painters such as Sargent, Zorn, Fechin, the Impressionists, as well as the golden age illustrators like N. C. Wyeth, Dean Cornwell, Haddon Sundbloom, Harvey Dunn and Rockwell. As with most artists, Michael is incredibly passionate about his life’s work.
(legacygallery.com)


She grew up holdin' her own
The Legacy Gallery
Jackson Hole, WY

A man of peace
The Legacy Gallery
Scottsdale, AZ

Into the high country
The Legacy Gallery
Scottsdale, AZ

Winter mountain dusk
All Images from cmdudash.com


Over the past 27 years, Michael Dudash has completed over 1,250 oil paintings and assignments for clients worldwide. His earlier illustration career focused on creating artwork for the movie industry, advertisers, publishers, books, magazines, design firms, corporations and institutions such as the United Nations and the U.S. Postal Service. Those pieces have won him a national reputation and numerous awards from the Society of Illustrators (NYC & LA), the Society of Publication Designers, Communications Arts and HOW Magazine. Michael has written and published articles for American Artist, the Artists Magazine and Step-by-Step Graphics. He has featured his work as a guest lecturer at the Booth Western Art Museum & Washington University. In recent years, Michael has turned his efforts almost exclusively to the sale of his original oil paintings and limited edition prints. He has begun to branch out internationally with his work and has found the same success abroad as he has enjoyed at home. Michael works out of his home and studio in Vermont.
(tapestryproductions.com)