Wednesday, July 24, 2013

FRANK E. SCHOONOVER




Frank E. Schoonover
From oakknollbooks.files.wordpress.com


The Brandywine School was a style of illustration — as well as an artists colony in Chadds Ford, Pennsylvania, near Brandywine Creek — both founded by artist Howard Pyle (1853–1911) at the end of the 19th century. The works produced there were widely published in adventure novels, magazines and romances in the early 20th Century. Pyle was mentor to such successful artists as N. C. Wyeth, Frank E. Schoonover, Stanley M. Arthurs, W.J. Aylward, Thornton Oakley, Violet Oakley, Clifford Ashley, Anna Whelan Betts, Ethel Franklin Betts and Harvey Dunn.
(chetvergvecher.livejournal.com)






Golden Age Comic Book Stories
All images from chetvergvecher.livejournal


From childhood, Frank Schoonover was drawn to the outdoors and opportunities to explore the wonder of nature. As he put it, “I don’t know what I was looking for but I loved the water and the streams.” It’s no wonder then, that as his passion for both the outdoors and art grew, he began creating pen and ink drawings of streams, bridges, buildings, and barns. It wasn’t long before he realized that illustration was his true passion. This excerpt from Frank E. Schoonover Catalogue Raisonné by John Schoonover, Louise Schoonover Smith, and LeeAnn Dean describes Schoonover’s first experiences studying art under the famous Howard Pyle.
In early September, 1896, an advertisement in the Philadelphia Inquirer forever changed his course. Listed in the newspaper was the fall offering of classes at Drexel Institute of Art, Science and Industry in Philadelphia. He scoured the ad and “…it said that anyone with a desire for illustration could have the instruction in that kind of art under the tutelage of Howard Pyle, that if the work in hand would pass the judgment of Howard Pyle. Well that was it.”
(An Excerpt from Frank E. Schoonover Catalogue Raisonné at oakknollbooks.wordpress.com)


Schoonover (far left) with Drexel students

Pyle with favorites Stanley Arthurs (left) and Schoonover
Images from oakknollbooks.files.wordpress.com


He confronted his parents. “I really think that I’m not really material or fitted to be a Presbyterian minister. I think I’d like to go down and study with Mr. Pyle and be an illustrator. They didn’t seem to object very much to it.” With the goal of eventually studying under Pyle, a hopeful Schoonover submitted drawings for admission to Drexel to Clifford P. Grayson, director of the School of Drawing, Painting, and Modeling in the Department of Fine and Applied Art. He was accepted into that four-year program at a time when Philadelphia provided a compelling environment for artists, educators, and those interested in the arts. Significant among those in Philadelphia at the time was William Merritt Chase, who started teaching at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts in 1896. William Glackens had returned to the city, Cecelia Beaux critiqued Academy portrait classes, and Thomas Anshutz taught its antique classes. Sculptor Charles Grafly instructed at Drexel and the Academy, and Howard Pyle was a luminary at Drexel. “The training provided in these surroundings was grounded in sound academic curricula with an evolving specialization in illustration.” Concurrently, the swift development of photoengraving throughout the country during the nineteenth century’s last quarter favorably advanced American illustration as an art form.
(An Excerpt from Frank E. Schoonover Catalogue Raisonné at oakknollbooks.wordpress.com)


BLACKBEARD BUCCANEER cover Illustration
From pinterest.com


Schoonover went on to win one of the ten prestigious scholarships to the Chadds Ford Summer classes in 1898 and 1899 where Pyle tutored the most advanced students. Under Pyle's encouragement he was soon illustrating books, many of the themes heavily influenced by his love of the outdoors. When Pyle left Drexel to build his own school, Schoonover went with him.
In 1903, Schoonover spent four months exploring the Hudson Bay and James Bay areas of Quebec and Ontario on foot and by dogsled. This experience turned out to be the inspiration for some of his best work throughout his career, including a series of illustrated stories for Scribner's Magazine in 1905.
From then on he never missed an opportunity to travel from the studio in his quest to absorb atmosphere and local colour: Virginia, Colorado, Montana, Louisiana, Jamaica, etc. Also in 1905 he had his first fiction published and became a member of the Society of Illustrators.
In 1906, he left Pyle's school to open his own studio in Wilmington, Delaware at 1305 Franklin Street and later at 1616 Rodney Street, which was to become home base for the rest of his life. He married Martha Culbertson of Philadelphia in 1911. From 1903 to 1913 he did illustrations for all the major magazines of the day (Harpers, Ladies' Home Journal, Scribner's, Century, McClures), and soon became recognized as one of the country's premier illustrators.
He continued his association with Pyle until the master's death in 1911 - together they worked on the Hudson County Courthouse Murals. Besides doing magazine illustration, Schoonover wrote articles and stories and illustrated more than two hundred classics and children's books. Throughout his career he illustrated the works of many famous authors: Edgar Rice Burroughs, Jack London, Rex Beach, Zane Grey, Robert W. Chambers, Gilbert Parker, Henry Van Dyke, Clarence Mulford, etc.
(ERB C.H.A.S.E.R. ENCYCLOPEDIA at erbzine.com)


Locksley Shoots before Prince John
From libraryarchives.standrews-de.org


The above painting was given by donors Frank E. Schoonover and J. Thompson Brown on January 15, 1936. It was created as an illustration for the book "Ivanhoe" published in 1929. A series of Frank Schoonover's Ivanhoe paintings was loaned to the School on May 25, 1931, and then presented to the Episcopal Church School Foundation to be shown at the School as a gift from the donors. (libraryarchives.standrews-de.org)
Frank Schoonover illustrated more than 150 classic books and hundreds of the great illustrated magazines of the day. More than five million readers every month saw his illustrations of the fiction of Jack London and Zane Grey. And he was the first to visualize the legendary western character Hopalong Cassidy. Dramatic reenactments shot in wilderness regions of Wyoming, the Canadian North and the Delaware River in eastern Pennsylvania are underscored with the music of Aaron Copeland Appalachian Spring to entertainingly recreate the subjects Frank Schoonover loved first - horses and dogsleds, buckskins and snowshoes, holsters and knives, prairie grass and ice.
Frank Schoonover’s creative vision transcended the pop culture mandates he and contemporaries such as Howard Pyle and N.C. Wyeth obliged. Schoonover’s moody monochromatic sketches of boys toiling in coal mines and girls laboring in textile mills are visionary social commentary that reinforces how art can be a catalyst of social change. Frank Schoonover’s rapture with life itself inspired his passion for authenticity, which envisioned both America’s wistful recollection of itself, and our relentless aspiration of a more perfect union.
(shop.wvia.org)
Schoonover's subject matter included cowboys, Indians, and Canadian trappers. His forms were simple and well defined and his moods powerful. Later in his career, his style became less rigid and more impressionistic. He was also an accomplished watercolorist and muralist and an avid photographer. He used photographs as references for his illustrations to remind himself of the mood and character of the models. Besides doing magazine illustration, Schoonover wrote articles and stories and illustrated more than two hundred classics and children's books. He and Gayle Hoskins organized the Wilmington Sketch Club in 1925, and in 1931 lectured at the School of Illustration for the John Herron Art Institute of Indianapolis. In 1942 he began his own school in Wilmington, where he taught art classes until 1968, when he was ninety-one years of age. After a series of paralyzing strokes, which ended his artistic career in 1968, Schoonover died at the age of ninety-five in 1972.
(schoonoverstudios.com)


Tuesday, July 23, 2013

FRANK WILLIAM BRANGWYN




Frank Brangwyn
From brangwyn.net


Charity
From artclon.com


Sir Frank William Brangwyn RA RWS RBA (12 May 1867 – 11 June 1956) was an Anglo-Welsh artist, painter, water colourist, virtuoso engraver and illustrator, and progressive designer. He received some artistic training, probably from his father, and later from Arthur Heygate Mackmurdo and in the workshops of William Morris, but he was largely an autodidact without a formal artistic education. At the age of seventeen, one of his paintings was accepted at the Royal Academy Summer Exhibition, he was strengthened in his conviction to become an artist.
(Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia)
After his family moved to England in 1875 Brangwyn entered the South Kensington Art Schools and from 1882 to 1884 worked for William Morris. Brangwyn's plein-air work in Cornwall from 1884 to 1888 resulted in a series of oils, exhibited at the Royal Academy and the Royal Society of British Artists, London, in which the subdued tones indicate the influences of Whistler and the Newlyn school.
(tate.org.uk)


Funeral at Sea
From bbc.co.uk


Initially he painted traditional subjects about the sea and life on the seas. His canvas, Funeral At Sea (1890) won a medal of the 3rd class at the 1891 Paris Salon. The limited palette in this painting is typical of his Newlyn period (although he was not officially a Newlyn artist). By the late 19th century Orientalism had become a favoured theme for many painters. Soon Brangwyn was attracted by the light and the bright colours of these southern countries. He travelled to Istanbul and the Black Sea, working as a deck hand for his passage. He made many paintings and drawings, particularly of Spain, Morocco, Egypt, and Turkey. This lightened his palette, a change that initially did not find critical favor. He continued his travels to different parts of Africa, including South Africa.
(tate.org.uk)


The Swans

The Lower Reaches of the Thames

Fruits and Flagon
All Images from bbc.co.uk


The earthquake of 1910 in Messina, Sicily, inspired a notable series of watercolours, while in etching, which he had begun in 1904, he evolved a monumental style using strong chiaroscuro. Industry, shipping and contemporary London and Venice were favourite theme, lithographs, war posters, and pageant, scenery and architectural designs. From 1924 Brangwyn was occupied with what he regarded as the culmination of his life's work, for panels for the Royal Gallery in the House of Lords. These were rejected by the Lords as being too flamboyant. On completion in 1933 they were purchased for the Guildhall, Swansea: they are still in situ. After his murals of 1930–34 for the Rockefeller Center, New York, he devoted himself to religious art. Brangwyn paid little regard to contemporary developments in art and in his later years lived virtually as a recluse at Ditchling, where he had settled in 1918.
(tate.org.uk)


‘Making Sailors: Youthful Ambition’
From tate.org.uk


Brangwyn was an artistic jack-of-all-trades. As well as paintings and drawings, he produced designs for stained glass, furniture, ceramics, table glassware, buildings and interiors, was a lithographer and woodcutter and was an illustrator of books. In 1952 Clifford Musgrave estimated that Brangwyn had produced over 12,000 works. He collaborated with Japanese Urushibara Mokuchu on a series of woodblock prints. Brangwyn's mural commissions would cover over 22,000 sq ft (2,000 m2) of canvas, he painted over 1,000 oils, over 660 mixed media works (watercolours, gouache), over 500 etchings, about 400 wood engravings and woodcuts, 280 lithographs, 40 architectural and interior designs, 230 designs for furniture, and 20 stained glass panels and windows.
Towards the end of his life, Brangwyn donated many of his own and other artworks to museums and galleries in Britain and Europe. In 1944, he recovered and secured designs by Frederic Shields for the Chapel of the Ascension built by Herbert Horne, which was destroyed in 1940 during the London Blitz. In 1950, one of his last works provided illustrations for the book Sixty Years of Yachts by Herbert Julyan, a good friend.
(Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia)


Monday, July 22, 2013

CORNELIS VREEDENBURGH




Familie Vreedenburgh met Cornelis
From gallery.dorant.net


Farm next to canal

Ships On A Puddle

Of Woerdense Verlaat
Images from wikipaintings.org


View on the Amstel Sun
From graphic.ir


Cornelis Vreedenburgh was born in Woerden on August 25th, 1880 and was a loyal follower of The Hague School Impressionism all his life. His characteristic style of short, often colourful strokes and highlights, has a luminous feel to it that is totally his own. His father, who painted himself and had a large painting company, gave him his first drawing lessons when he was very young. He went on to study with the famous artists Willem Tholen and Paul Arntzenius. Vreedenburgh had a fondness for water landscapes and together with his former tutor and friend Tholen, he often travelled outdoors near waterways and rivers to paint.
(lesliesmith.nl)


Fair In Laren
From wikipaintings.org


A sunny view of a farm in a polder
From nevsepic.com.ua


After his marriage to the painter M. Schotel they spent some time together in the village of Saint Tropez in the south of France. Back in Holland they settled in the small town of Hattem for a time but eventually moved to the “Gooi” and the town of Laren later on. Vreedenburgh returned to Amsterdam, the city that captivated him, on a regular basis to paint the canals and “grachtenpanden”. During a study trip to Palestine and a commissioned trip to the “Holy Land” of Israël, Vreedenburgh produced many sketches and studies in watercolour and oil paint.
(lesliesmith.nl)


Cows in the Meadow

With The Koepelkerk Beyond
Images from wikipaintings.org


In 1937 Queen Wilhelmina bought two of his paintings, “Cows in the Meadow” and “The Prins Hendrikkade in Amsterdam”. The latter was stolen in the Second World War by the German forces and has never been found. Vreedenburgh was a member of the artist society “Pulchri Studio” in The Hague, “Lucas” in Laren and “Arti et Amicitae” in Amsterdam. He won numerous medals for his work during his lifetime, including a silver medal in San Francisco, the Willink van Collen Prize through Art et Amicitiae and a bronze medal in Arnhem. Vreedenburgh died in Laren on June 27th, 1946.
(lesliesmith.nl)



Thursday, July 18, 2013

JAMES GUTHRIE




To Pastures New 1882-83
Fromdeflam’s photostream at flickr.com


Hard At It 1883

In the Orchard 1885-86
Images from 19thcenturybritpaint.blogspot.com


Pastoral
From bbc.co.uk


Sir James Guthrie (1859-1930) was one of the Glasgow Boys, a group of late-19th century Scottish painters influenced by French realist Jules Bastien-Lepage. Like some other artists of middle-class origin in those days, his family sent him to university with the idea that he would practice law.
And like the others he abandoned that line of education to take up art, though his art training came largely by self-education. Regardless of how he mastered his skills, Guthrie became one of the most prominent Scottish artists of his time. By 1902 he was president of the Royal Scottish Academy and in 1903 was knighted. (artcontrarian.blogspot.com)


A Hind's Daughter

Schoolmates

Boy With a Straw

Gypsy Fires are Burning for Daylight's Past and Gone

Poppleton, The Artist at Work

Field Work in the Lothians
Images from the-athenaeum.org


Unlike many of his contemporaries he did not study in Paris, being mostly self-taught, although he was mentored for a short time by James Drummond in Glasgow and then John Pettie in London.
He lived most of his life in the Scottish Borders, most notably in Cockburnspath, Berwickshire, where he painted some of his most important works, including A Hind Daughter (1883), and Schoolmates. He was elected an associate of the Royal Scottish Academy in 1888, and a full member in 1892. In 1902 he succeeded Sir George Reid as RSA president in 1902.
(intofineart.com)


Wednesday, July 17, 2013

MEAD SCHAEFFER




Captain Blood
From bpib.com


Mead Blackbuck
From getlostblog.wordpress.com


Captain Pinken
From pinterest.com


The Count of Monte Cristo
From getlostblog.files.wordpress.com


Mead Schaeffer was born in 1898 in Freedom Plains, New York. He's of the same generation as Saul Tepper, Boris Artzybasheff, Rico Tomaso, Haddon Sundblom, Donald Teague, Floyd Davis, Edwin Georgi and Norman Rockwell - a generation that was to explode into the pages of the nation's illustrated magazines in the 1930's through the 1950's. Schaeffer attended the Pratt Institute in New York City and after his graduation in 1920 he took further studies with Harvey Dunn and Dean Cornwell. He very quickly got work in the waning issues of the smaller, traditional magazines.
(By Jim Vadeboncoeur, Jr. - JVJ PUBLISHING at bpib.com)

The followings are images from Moby Dick by Herman Melville,
Published by Dodd, Mead & Co ~ 1923:


Moby Dick

Ahab

I will soon be out

Townho story
All images from thegoldenagesite.blogspot.com


1922 was the same year he began doing book illustrations. Just as Scribner's had their classics with mostly Wyeth illustrations, Dodd-Mead began a similar series with Schaeffer doing the majority of the titles. Quite an honor for a 24-year-old. His earliest books were Herman Melville titles: Moby Dick (1922), Typee (1923) and Omoo (1924). He also did a pair of Rand McNally titles in their adventure/classic series in 1924: Adventures of Remi and King Arthur and His Knights. These early efforts represent the first of three very distinct stylistic approaches of his career.
(By Jim Vadeboncoeur, Jr. - JVJ PUBLISHING at bpib.com)


Ladies Home Journal 1931
From navarrobadia.blogspot.com


The followings are images from The Three Musketeers by Alexandre Dumas,
Published by Dodd, Mead & Co ~ 1929:


Frontis

Drew his Rapier

Threw the Dice

Received Instructions

Felton bowed his head
All images from null-entropy.com


Paratrooper Periscope

Tank Patrol
Images from surfsedge.com


In 1930, Schaeffer turned his attention from fictional characters to real people depicted in real settings. During the 1930s and 1940s he received commissions from magazines including Good Housekeeping , McCall's, the Saturday Evening Post, The Ladies Home Journal, Country Gentleman, and Cosmopolitan. He produced 46 covers for the weekly Saturday Evening Post. His work as a war correspondent for the Post during World War II resulted in a well-known series of covers illustrating American military personnel. He lived for a time in New Rochelle, New York, but for most of his career lived in Arlington, Vermont, where his studio was in a barn. Norman Rockwell was a good friend, and Schaeffer and his family often posed as models for Rockwell's Saturday Evening Post illustrations and paintings.
(From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia)


Forbidden Lover
The Ladies Home Journal July 1932
From getlostblog.files.wordpress.com


Schaeffer abandoned the romantic adventure milieu in favor of more realistic subject matter. According to a quote in Susan E. Meyer's 1981 book, Norman Rockwell's People, "I suddenly realized I was sick of it all - sick of painting dudes and dandies. I longed to do honest work, based on real places, real people and real things." Which sounds all well and good, but he had always gone to great lengths to put realism into his paintings, often traveling to exotic locales so as to get the images right for a book or story. All of the people, places and things he'd been painting were very "real." Maybe it was Rockwell that influenced him, but World War II may have changed his perspective, also.
(By Jim Vadeboncoeur, Jr. - JVJ PUBLISHING at bpib.com)