Sunday, July 27, 2014

ROGER DALE BROWN



ROGER DALE BROWN in 2008 
From dotcourson.com 


ROGER DALE BROWN 
pototschnik.blogspot.com 


Farm at Herns Mill Rd 
From wallsgallery.com 


Roger believes, as the historical master artists such as John Carlson and Edgar Payne, that "plein air" painting is an essential element in being a great artist. He spends countless hours studying and painting on location, to continue to perfect seeing important nuances of a scene, a day, or an object, which are necessary in creating a great painting. Roger works hard to balance the emotion of a scene, with the knowledge of painting, in every painting he paints. 
Roger's oil paintings have been displayed in galleries throughout the United States and have won many awards which include: First Place in the Barnes and Farms National Juried Art Show, Museum Purchase Award and third place at the Easton Plein Air Competition, Best of Show at the Central South National Juried Show, as well as the Gold Medal Award from the Hudson Valley Art Association. His work has also been accepted in the Oil Painters of America National Juried Exhibition, and Salon International. Roger has been published by: International Artist Magazine, American Artist Magazine, American Art Collector Magazine, and the Artist Magazine. His works are owned by private collectors across the country and include many well-known celebrities and major corporations.
(rogerdalebrown.com)


After the storm
From nashvillearts.com


Today Roger is not only one of the most notable artists in the genre of plein-air paintings; he encourages others to step onto his vapor trail. He has become the go-to teacher in this region for the genre; any starry-eyed dreamer who hopes to become a painter in the Impressionist vein has taken classes with him. By going into the backcountry to hike, by traveling all over the country in his camper, it seems Brown has captured every rugged mountain, golden field, calm harbor, and snowy forest—and he has captured them in the ever-changing sunlight with loose, energetic strokes.
(nashvillearts.com)


Still Harbor Sunning 

Twilight Last Glow 
Images from thesylvangallery.com 


Sentries 
From outdoorpainter.com 


Roger Dale Brown visited the coast of Maine and painted his impressions of it. The results are gathered in an exhibition titled, appropriately enough, "Maine Impressions." This detail from Brown's painting "Sentries" shows Brown's purposeful use of value and color. Brown reports that the light yellow mark by the goose's beak was an invention. "I created the area by adding a light spot below the darkness of the goose's head," he says. "This created a stronger contrast in that area. This, along with a sharper edge and the strong shadow, is enough to make the viewer stop. This portion of the painting was placed there on purpose. I place objects, colors, or value in certain areas of my paintings with intent -- not being literal to the scene but being creative and evoking the mood and story of the moment. I want the viewer to go to certain spots in my painting -- it's like taking the viewer on a guided tour throughout your creation. You enter the painting in a certain area and there are stopping points the viewer comes to and hangs out for a while. These are tension areas or subordinate focal points in the painting. They are not strong enough to compete with the focal point, but are strong enough to pull your eye around the painting." 
(ootdoorpaintr.com)


Listen 

Glimmering Evening 
Images from wallsgallery.com 


Roger finds himself mesmerized by the charm, history, and natural beauty of Maine. He said, It has an old soul. Artists are naturally drawn to it. It’s more spiritual.That spiritual, artistic quality is essential to Brown’s style and general approach to painting. He paints the places that speak to him, the ones that conjure some emotion. And he does so by painting from life amongst the elements that inspires him whenever possible.
To capture the beauty Roger sees in Maine, he employs a delicate mix of Impressionism and Realism. Each scene calls for a different technique. Brushstrokes can range from loose to tight, and color can be built up through thin layers to thick impasto— whatever is needed to conjure the feeling Brown himself felt that day. The result is work that feels real, like you’re there standing amongst the sand, sea and and rocks. You can almost smell the saltwater and feel the warmth of the sun. 
"Maine is an artist’s dream,” says Gary R. Haynes, gallery founder and long-time friend of Brown’s. “Artists have come here for generations, but Roger’s looking at it from a new angle. He’s aware of the history of place, but he doesn’t let that distract from his vision. He wants to share the essence of the place in a fresh way and he does that beautifully.” 
(bangordailynews.com)


 Luminesce
From dotcourson.com


Painting in the Plein Air style by definition puts the artist in places that are not normally near their studio. That creates extra challenges and difficulties in satisfactorily recreating what you saw on location on the canvas. Roger Dale Brown, after some humorous trial and error, has finally arrived at a workable, even comfortable solution. He pulls his studio behind a burly diesel pick-up in the form of a 33’ travel trailer. He and his wife, Beverly, head out annually for 6 to 7 months - one trip in 2013 will keep them on the road for 4 months - to locations of particular beauty around the US. Their abhorrence of motels, the difficulty of schlepping all their gear and luggage in and out, and wet canvases in motel rooms pushed them into the rolling studio world. But, what a journey that has been. The first attempt at this was a 21’ RV. Seemed like a reasonable, economical choice until they took that first trip to Yellowstone. Way too small and under equipped. So, up they jumped to a 34’ RV, but that required they pull a car behind it in order to drop off canvases at in-town galleries. But the car was too small to hold the large canvases. Finally, they landed on the truck/trailer combo. However, more fun was in store for the first trip with the new rig. With the awning left extended one night and the trailer parked on a slight incline, down came the rain, flowing down the awning and right into the interior for an unwanted indoor waterfall feature. The storm and its clouds did have a silver lining - since gutting the interior was a must, the Browns redesigned the space to better suit living and working needs. Out went the dining table and large sofa to be replaced by a smaller sofa and two drawer units converted into a table with rollers, on which the couple takes their meals. That made room for each to have their comfy work space for easel, canvas, palette, and brushes. Life on the road now is much sweeter and a lot more productive. (jerryparkphotography.com)


Wednesday, July 16, 2014

A FINE ARTIST AND TEACHER





Untitled
 Images from terenchin.com 


The strong man 
 From s007.radikal.ru 


Born in White Plains, New York, Howitt was struck with a case of polio at age four. During his time of recovery and convalescing, his father drew pictures for the boy and encouraging him to draw also. As he got older and his affliction limited his other physical activies, drawing became a passion for “Newton,” and he devoted more serious attention to it. 
The young Howitt was quite studious and graduated from high school at age sixteen. He then enrolled at the Art Students league in New York City where he studied under noted the noted instructor George Bridgeman. Howitt embarked upon a career in illustration, and from 1910-1930 he led an extensive commercial career with paintings appearing in the magazines Pictoral Review, Liberty, The Saturday Evening Post, Colliers, and Delineator, all of which were extremely high profile publications of the day. In addition he illustrated several books as well as stories for the newspaper supplemental sections, This Week, New York Herald Tribune, and the American Sunday Monthly Magazine. 
 (adventurehouse.com) 


Road to the village 
 From goodfon.ru 


During the 1920s Howitt was commisioned to create advertising work for several nation-wide companies that included Jello Foods, Post Bran Flakes, Devoe Paints, Vermont Marble and Crisco Shortening. In between commercial assignments, Howitt always devoted his time to painting landscapes. He traveled extensively in North America, painting everywhere he went. He established a solid reputation as a landscape painter of high quality and he exhibited his works regulary in prominent galleries. To this day his landscapes hang in noted museuems and public collections across the country. 
 (adventurehouse.com) 


The Spider July-1935 

 The Spider October-1937 

The Scorpion 
All images from pulpcovers.com 


As the depths of the Depression struck, Howitt apparently found himself on shaky ground financially. Unable to earn a living from his past markets, he turned to the pulps as a means to make a living. Howitt had reached middle-age and was much older than many of his contemporary pulp artists just beginning a career. The forty-eight year old Howitt could have considered the pulps nothing but a step down from the level of succes he had achieved. According to Mrs. Shirley Steeger, wife of Harry Steeger who knew Howitt well, he “deplored the work — but it was meticulously done.” 
 (adventurehouse.com) 


 Football Player 

 Woman on a Bike 

 Sleeping Baker 
Images from saturdayeveningpost.com 


SEP Cover, Sleeping Baker 
 From etsy.com 


According to the artist,"Too much emphasis is put on art fashions of the moment and there is not enough recognition of good painting. We who are not "modernists" have found that we get no recognition today in art circles unless our work is clothed in the style that is considered fashionable. It does not matter how well or how forcibly we express it; we get no attention from critics or museums or even the large exhibitions. Museum collections of American paintings will never be important as long as they only follow the latest fad in art.
Painting should have a more solid basis than fashion. As long as it is not possible for an artist to paint for mass production and do good work, many painters today are quite willing to adapt their prices to the buyer's pocketbook. We artists are ready to meet the private buyer half-way. We believe that no painting stacked against the wall is fulfilling its function. We must sell to continue painting and unless we can continue, art will die, because painting is not a part-time job." 
 (David Saunders 2009 at pulpartists.com) 


Patriotic Employment Poster WWII 1944 
 WWII Patriotic Posters Civilian Jobs 
 From crazywebsite.com 


Because of the men severing in the military and the nation's industries increased wartime production efforts, there was a critical shortage of labor. Consequently, women were hired in increasing numbers and their participation in the job market increased extremely. During this push for greater production, the employment of women in America rose from about twelve million to more than eighteen million. 
By the end of World War Two, women made up about 35 percent of the labor force. The type of people presented on posters such as these were not haphazardly created. The selection of an "average Joe" to personify American male workers was selected to gain the "common man's" allegiance to production goals and approving use of women for the workforce. 
The average working woman on the other hand was idealized as a fashion model in denim; this carefully glamorized image was intended to convince women that they would not have to sacrifice their femininity by taking a traditionally "man's job" for war support work.
Second World War American patriotic posters like "I'm Proud, my husband wants me to do my part." helped unite Americans and mobilize the private and industrial sectors; U.S. citizens of every age, gender, and walk of life did their part to support the war effort, allied military and defeat the axis powers. U.S. citizens hoped that the Axis powers could be stopped without American military support and hoped America could avoid direct involvement in World War 2 but that all changed the morning of December 7 when Japan blindsided the U.S. military with bombs in the attack of Pearl Harbor Hawaii and other U.S. military outposts. The military might of the United States of America of course responded with a powerful vengeance but leaders knew that troops could not win the war alone. The American citizens rallied for the troops and swift mobilization of American citizenry and industry during World War II was an achievement without precedent in speed, scale, complexity and duration.
(crazywebsite.com) 
Howitt disappeared from the pulp field following the September 1939 issue of The Spider and the September/October 1939 issue of Operator 5. Howitt had moved back to the “slick” magazines exclusively, along with his advertising art; he also painted wartime posters for the Red Cross. 
He continued, as he started, painting commercial and fine art—obsessively, every day—until his death in 1958 at the age of 72, even winning awards in later years for his landscapes. It is believed that Howitt ultimately looked down on his career in the pulps despite the effort he put into it. His wife, Bertha (1880-1975), definitely did, preferring her husband to be remembered as a fine artist and teacher. There are very few known existing original pulp paintings by Howitt, and this appears to be intentional on the part of the artist or his widow. 
 (2010 Age of Aces Books)